semantic

(redirected from semantical)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to semantical: syntactic

semantic

1. of or relating to semantics
2. Logic concerned with the interpretation of a formal theory, as when truth tables are given as an account of the sentential connectives

semantic

(1) For the software company, see Symantec.

(2) For language-related definitions, see semantics, semantic error, semantic gap and Semantic Web.
References in periodicals archive ?
My suggestion is that, since both the manifestation of that very political power that tends to become absolute, and the metaphysical realism are, from the current democratic political rhetoric, either inappropriate or ineffective, a pragmatic inferentialist approach to semantical features of wooden language might be helpful in giving insight into evaluation of the uses of value judgments in political discourse generally.
The working definition in the United Kingdom reflects an evolving semantical process that was based on the "Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Acts of 1989": It was defined as "the use of violence for political ends, and includes any use of violence for the purpose of putting the public or any section of the public in fear.
The answer of some philosophers of science some decades ago was: the theories can contradict only if they have the same language in their syntactical part, respectively, the same semantical model of their mathematical structures.
somewhat, was a more semantical than substantive compromise, shifting
The highest degree of idiomaticity can be found in proverbs and sayings, for their meaning is usually completely unpredictable from their lexical constituents from the semantical point of view.
Modeling semantical, temporal, and spatial information in geographic information systems.
On a Unitary Semantical Analysis for Definite and Indefinite Descriptions," Descriptions and Beyond, Eds.
We also do not know whether students can build these skills towards some generalized mathematic semantical competence (numeracy); no research to date has evaluated a comprehensive program across years for this population.
He preferred the positive semantical nomenclature: the embracive power of collegiality and complementarity--the working together of differently gifted and experienced individuals among distributed duties and powers in a respected, tested institution, designed to render a common good, larger than the mere sum of separate, individual parts.
Any semantical approach to this question usually involves extremely complicated calculations.
Was the reason for semantical fastidiousness rooted in the rationale of how could inaction be justified to prevent further risk to white lives--especially in a conflict in the 'hood' of Rwanda?
He closes with a brief passage on semantical morals and ideas for further work.

Full browser ?