semicolon


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semicolon

Semicolons ( ; ) are used for two main purposes: to separate lengthy or complex items within a list and to connect independent clauses. They are often described as being more powerful than commas, while not quite as a strong as periods (full stops).
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semicolon:

see punctuationpunctuation
[Lat.,=point], the use of special signs in writing to clarify how words are used; the term also refers to the signs themselves. In every language, besides the sounds of the words that are strung together there are other features, such as tone, accent, and pauses,
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Semicolon

 

a punctuation mark consisting of a period above a comma (;). A semicolon is used between the clauses of a conjunctionless compound sentence if the clauses are lengthy and contain commas, and between the clauses of a complex sentence if they are fairly long or contain commas. A semicolon is also used between lengthy homogeneous parts of a simple sentence, particularly if one of them contains commas. Finally, a semicolon is used between collaterally subordinated clauses if they are long, contain commas, and are not joined by coordinating conjunctions.

semicolon

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Common: ITU-T: semicolon; semi. Rare: weenie; INTERCAL: hybrid, pit-thwong.

semicolon

In programming, the semicolon (;) is often used to separate various elements of an expression. For example, in the C statement for (x=0; x<10; x++) the semicolons separate the starting value, number of iterations and increment).
References in periodicals archive ?
Kunene replaces Mofolo's first semicolon with a full stop.
Heath transcribed the poem in 1838, in the Heath Commonplace book, we find a comma rather than a semicolon before the phrase (we also, in another deviation from the published poem, find a full stop after it), and this not because of an aversion to semicolons on the part of Heath (a semicolon appears earlier in the transcription ["sounding furrows; for my purpose"]).
However, note that the first word after the semicolon is not capitalized unless it is a proper noun.
3) The semicolon was only widely adopted in England in the late 16th century (Parkes 1992: 86, 216-217; Bruthiaux 1995; Lennard 1995: 67), which accounts for its absence in the sixteenth-century handbooks consulted.
Sam Roberts, the semicolon guy, said it best recently when he enthused: "Being reporters, we're paid to basically get a graduate education in whatever we're interested in
Back in 1935, journalist James Bone said that his colleague George Mair was so fastidious that "he once phoned a semicolon from Moscow".
The most common problem with the colon is that it tends to be confused with the semicolon (;).
So, like a good editor (OK, ``as'' a good editor) she removed a herd of commas, eliminated hyphens, put in a semicolon or two and made my spelling conform to words as they actually appeared in dictionaries of English.
It doesn't do sentence case unless the highlighted text contains a period or semicolon.
If you are frightened to use a colon or semicolon, Ms Truss has the chapter for you.
He was accused of slipping a semicolon, and thus his nationalism, into the "general welfare" clause, allegedly to create the provision of the general welfare as a distinct power of the government apart from the enumerated mechanisms of finance.
Full stop is aided by the ever-trustworthy and serviceable comma, semicolon, and colon.