semiquaver


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semiquaver

Music a note having the time value of one-sixteenth of a semibreve
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Four semiquavers would be '1-e-and-a' (A) and 'one a penny' (C), and multiple beats of semiquavers in a row described as 'one a penny, two a penny' (C).
The eight-bar piano postlude which follows is devoid of recognizable melodic or rhythmic connections to the setting of the narrative; both the presence of the narrator (as depicted by the melody in the vocal line) and that of the wagtail (as represented by the fluttering semiquaver motif in the accompaniment) have been eliminated, and a hint of continuity is maintained only in the quavers of the accompaniment, which seem to echo the baby's musings.
Many have added fingering (especially on semiquaver runs
Most theoretical terms for dealing with time in music advertise their participation in a hierarchy: measure, phrase, semiquaver.
Passages were rhythmically simple with occasional semiquaver movement emphasising melodic and intervallic interpretation.
References to 'dotting' refer to specific (musical) notes and to Sharp's dotting of the first of a pair of quavers, with the attendant reduction of the second quaver to a semiquaver.
The second motif always began with the rapid four-beat semiquaver running figure, which was followed by decelerating quaver-like beats.
Towards the end of the recitative, tremolo movement with a con mow added to the andante provides some urgency for the conclusion; otherwise, occasional passages of off-beat rhythm or bars of semiquaver action are generally isolated and their push towards forward motion brought to a halt by general pauses that isolate the several gestures.
Fine orchestral playing included neat semiquaver passages, lovely snatches of solo violin and again excellent trombone solos and general instrumental support.
In the 1912 and 1919 arrangements, a quaver-triplet figure rises from the dominant to tonic to emphasise the downbeat (a minim on tonic A); this is replaced by a semiquaver triplet and a staccato quaver A on the downbeat.
Two gliding notes to a single 'up or down bow' are comparatively easy to play (compare the semiquaver passages in the Tannhauser overture); but two notes to a syllable for a few bars in succession present a greater difficulty to the singer because of the certainty, smoothness, and grace that are demanded of the executant, who should here closely imitate the violin.