glide

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glide

1. 
a. any of various dances featuring gliding steps
b. a step in such a dance
2. a manoeuvre in which an aircraft makes a gentle descent without engine power
3. the act or process of gliding
4. Music
a. a long portion of tubing slipped in and out of a trombone to increase its length for the production of lower harmonic series
b. a portamento or slur
5. Crystallog another name for slip
6. Cricket another word for glance (sense 1)

Glide

 

a short, incomplete sound that occurs during the transition from one complete sound to another, when the speech organs attempt to occupy a new position but the glottis remains open and expiration continues—for example, in Russian volia (“will”) between the v and o: [vωól’a]. The term “glide” is also used to refer to the nonsyllabic part of a diphthong.

glide

[glīd]
(aerospace engineering)
Descent of an aircraft at a normal angle of attack, with little or no thrust.
(crystallography)

glide

glideclick for a larger image
Forces in glide.
i. A controlled descent by a heavier-than-air aeronautical vehicle under little or no engine thrust. Gravity maintains the forward flight of the vehicle, and lift forces control the vertical descent.
ii. A descending flight path of a glide, such as a shallow glide.
iii. To descend in a glide.

Glide

(1) See Glide Effortless and Glide PhotoShare.

(2) Video chat for smartphones, tablets and smartwatches from Glide (www.glide.me). The Glide app lets users record and send a video up to five minutes long, and it keeps the ongoing video conversation in a thread like text messaging apps. See video chat.


Glide Video Messaging
In this example, the recipient James is being notified so he can watch the video being recorded in real time.
References in periodicals archive ?
the last component of the triphthong uoi was partially interpreted as the semivowel j (uoj).
2]) starts with a vowel quality of higher importance and ends in a semivowel with less prominence.
da-dam- "blow," and, perhaps, some of the stems listed above) suggests that the Middle West Iranian formant -id- or -ad- has been reduced to semivowels and then absorbed into the past stem.
Also, references concern Luick's account of the evolution of the cluster <sc> (179), fates of the velars (180-182), palatalisations (185), critical evaluation of Luick's account of the evolution of the semivowel [j] (189), shift of the yogh to [hi (191), and consonant gemination (203-204).
It is common to find category 1 diphthongs set to a single note, to two notes, and in more melismatic writing, to any number of notes, so long as the syllabic vowel outnumbers the semivowel.
The available evidence testifying presumably to the application of the rule in Old English is limited to virtually two cases, namely, genitive plural forms of i-stem nouns: Deni(g)a (< *dani) 'Dane' and wini(g)(e)a < (*wini) 'friend', both forms lacking the expected gemination of the nasal and preserving instead the palatal semivowel (Erdman 1972: 409).
It may be found in the approach syllable, as a semivowel ending a diphthong or triphthong, as in hereafter and o'erthrow.
In one and the same morpheme a semivowel [j] is sometimes reported before [e, [euro]], sometimes not (examples of both on p.
If a syllable ends in a vowel or semivowel it is "open;' and it is "closed" if it ends in a consonant.
We would also have to presume the insertion of an epenthetic -u-, here under the influence of the labial semivowel, again a fairly common Prakritic development (cf.
The terms semivowel and semiconsonant are used somewhat inconsistently in linguistic literature.
In other words, is the &lt;i&gt; a coda semivowel [i] or an onset semiconsonant [j]?