senior


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senior

1. Education
a. of, relating to, or designating more advanced or older pupils
b. of or relating to a secondary school
2. 
a. a senior pupil, student, etc.
b. a fellow of senior rank in an English university
References in classic literature ?
The Senior Subaltern was so pleased with getting his Company and his acceptance at the same time that he forgot to bother The Worm.
The Senior Subaltern had been holding forth on the merits of the girl he was engaged to, and the ladies were purring approval, while the men yawned, when there was a rustle of skirts in the dark, and a tired, faint voice lifted itself:
He had formed his own opinion from the papers entrusted to him, and did not especially want to go into the matter with his senior partner.
I thought I was well acquainted with the various methods by which a gentleman can throw away his money," the senior partner remarked.
At this solemn indictment the novice raised his hand and twitched his lip, while even the placid senior brothers glanced across at each other and coughed to cover their amusement.
He was ten years my senior both in years and service, and I rather think he could never forget the fact that he had been an officer when I was a green apprentice.
Ablewhite, senior, refused to lend his son a farthing.
We had better be going together over the ship, Captain," said the senior partner; and the three men started to view the perfections of the Nan-Shan from stem to stern, and from her keelson to the trucks of her two stumpy pole-masts.
Weller, senior, with much solemnity in his manner; 'there never was a nicer woman as a widder, than that 'ere second wentur o' mine--a sweet creetur she was, Sammy; all I can say on her now, is, that as she was such an uncommon pleasant widder, it's a great pity she ever changed her condition.
This detachment was followed by the seniors, who passed through the same scene of sorrow and distress.
Grave and reverend seniors seemed to have caught the prevailing spirit as badly as the students, and I saw white-bearded men rising and shaking their fists at the obdurate Professor.
It is also proper, that for performing these exercises the citizens should be divided into distinct classes, according to their ages, and that the young persons should have proper officers to be with them, and that the seniors should be with the magistrates; for having them before their eyes would greatly inspire true modesty and ingenuous fear.