sepulchral


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Related to sepulchral: straitlaced

sepulchral

sepulchral effigy
Of, or pertaining to, a tomb.
References in periodicals archive ?
In just a few days Hoylake will welcome the best golfers in the world and the sepulchral quiet and mosphere of anticipation around the 18th green today will give a to a very different type of tension.
Though the contrast between the clinically bright art boxes and the sepulchral gloom of the church adds an invigorating frisson to the viewing experience, the arrangement of the new installations respects the formality of the church's plan.
The reader can follow here the myriad circumstances of death among European elites of France, Germany, Portugal, and Italy, from ceremonial to burial, from sepulchral iconography to eulogy.
There has always been an element of the sepulchral in Segal's oeuvre.
But as the fire died, a sepulchral voice was heard from the pit: "One of my bones will take revenge on you
The Fairfield Four's sepulchral shout of ``Lonesome Valley'' sounded for all the world like an overcrowded churchyard's worth of spirits crying for their place in heaven.
The youth wear black jeans and leather jackets; their elders are in sepulchral gray.
Another is the chorus 'Crucifixus etiam pro nobis', where the strings snatch at every first beat (in those passages, at least, containing the word 'Crucifixus') to suggest the nails tearing into Christ's flesh; the hushed, sepulchral tone of the chorus in the final bars also helps to make this number specially memorable.
It was, Sissy Farenthold told me as we plodded along, only the second time a dissident procession had disturbed the sepulchral peace of this precinct of millionaires.
But Philippine Olympic Committee First Vice President Joey Romasanta is not reacting with sepulchral silence.
They discuss conceptual aspects such as funerary practices as a human phenomenon, ethical debates about euthanasia, reflecting on dead bodies, and a cultural historical paradigm for reflecting on deathbed prayers; national case studies of Italian graveyards, the cremation movement in Czech countries, sepulchral culture in East Germany, and changing death rituals in Denmark; and religious investigations of practices characterizing different forms of death, dying, and disposal, including changing Catholic funerals in the Netherlands, the role of pastors and relatives at Dutch Christian funerals, the position of death in Buddhism, and Muslim perceptions of life and death.