serpierite

serpierite

[′sər·pē·ə‚rīt]
(mineralogy)
(Cu,Zn,Ca)5(SO4)2(OH)6·3H2O A bluish-green mineral composed of hydrous basic sulfate of copper, zinc, and calcium; occurs in tabular crystals and tufts.
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Other minerals found there include the sulfide minerals chalcopyrite, galena, glaucodot, marcasite, pyrite and sphalerite, as well as anglesite, barite, brochantite, "nail-head" calcite, devilline, dolomite, linarite, malachite, quartz, schulenbergite, serpierite, smolyaninovite and wroewolfeite.
The iron sulfate melanterite is found as colorless, water-soluble fibers; blue copper sulfate chalcanthite lamellae and blue-green aggregates of acicular crystals of the Ca-Cu-Zn sulfate serpierite (some accompanied by green spherules of cornwallite) are found at Aghbar.
Occurrence: Associated minerals are: glaucocerinite, natroglaucocerinite, zaccagnaite, serpierite and hemimorphite.
Serpierite is a very rare secondary mineral found in a single specimen as translucent, sky blue radiating aggregates 1-2 mm in diameter, consisting of compact intergrown lath-shaped crystals (Szakall et at.
Species confirmed by X-ray diffraction during this study include alstonite, anglesite, ankerite, aragonite, barytocalcite, barite, brochantite, epsomite, harmotome, hydromagnesite, jarosite, marcasite, melanterite, millerite, serpierite, siderite, sulfur and witherite.
5 mm occur rarely with serpierite and harmotome in the quartz lining of a large cavity on the Brownley Hill vein.
Some green to blue-green coatings found on chalcopyrite may be some other mineral, for example, serpierite (E.
2]O, un nouveau mineral de la Mina de Chessy, France, polymorphe de la serpierite.
It is associated with serpierite, ktenasite and other zinc and iron sulfates and oxides.
Wet chemical and microscopic study indicates the presence of devillite as tiny flattened and tabular platy clusters of bluish-white crystals occurring sparingly at the Brick 2 with serpierite and ktenasite.
The story of modern Laurium begins in 1860, when the Italian mining engineer Giambattista Serpieri (for whom the sulfate mineral serpierite and its type locality, the Serpieri shaft, Laurium, were named) noticed that an Attica ship washed up on a beach in Sardinia had come with a ballast load of pure smithsonite.
Transparent, vitreous, bluish green encrustations of devilline associated with serpierite, schulenbergite and namuwite occur at the Kamareza mine.