sestet


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sestet

1. Prosody the last six lines of a Petrarchan sonnet
2. Prosody any six-line stanza
3. another word for sextet
References in periodicals archive ?
This structural bridge from the meditative, general composition of Doomsday in the octet to the analysis of his own situation in the first tercet of the sestet, it has not been pointed out, also recalls St.
In sonnet 22, for example, the octave contains an image of the two lovers meeting in heaven, but the sestet gives an image of love on earth as the preferred state.
This poem establishes a structure that many poems in the sequence adhere to: the octave presents an ideal of the present moment followed by a sestet that reminds both mother and reader of the disappointment of the future, confirming that the present passes.
To mention cursorily a few earlier examples, the poet-speaker in "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" writes of a reading experience that initiates and exposes him to an epic universe, an open, uncharted territory likened progressively in the sestet to the skies, the Pacific, the New World.
The sestet confirms this center: re-membering our childlikeness is required if we are to "unsuspectingly receive" that which is "fleeting," rather than grasping at it or fighting against it.
Like most of Hopkins's sonnets, this one uses the Italian form, octave and sestet.
In the English sonnets of John Milton, the octave and sestet run together without pause.
The sestet, as the title implies, is a six line poem, meant to suggest the sestet of an Italian sonnet, which follows the eight-line octave.
In the sestet, though, she discovers a way of negotiating paternal omnipotence, metaphorically compared to the "right" of "kings.
The volta occurs between the octet and sestet in a Petrarchan sonnet and sometimes between the 8th and 9th or between the 12th and 13th lines of a Shakespearean sonnet, as in William Shakespeare's sonnet number 130:
ALTHOUGH the ambiguities in the sestet of `The Windhover' have elicited screeds of commentary and debate, the octave of the sonnet has proved much less difficult to construe.
In the sestet, not to see the beloved is the equivalent of loss of hope, of death itself.