seventeen

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seventeen

1. the cardinal number that is the sum of ten and seven and is a prime number
2. a numeral, 17, XVII, etc., representing this number
3. the amount or quantity that is seven more than ten

Seventeen

novel of young love. [Am. Lit.: Booth Tarkington Seventeen in Magill I, 882]
References in periodicals archive ?
Nor was the content of Lady Margaret's month-mind different in kind from the funeral sermons that Fletcher claims to be a new didactic genre in the later sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, which established a "crucial link between protestantism and the evolution of modern English gender.
Part 4 is devoted to the "symposiastic lyric" of the seventeenth century: from Jonson to Herrick, imitators of Anacreon and Horace celebrated the civilized pleasures of friendship, wine, and poetic rapture, while the later Cavaliers and libertine poets of the Restoration made self-abandonment in drink and venery emblematic of their anti-Puritan politics.
One, as Sharpe points out, is that any model which looks to the Industrial Revolution (if indeed it ever happened) must account for the English experience, although in practice, and significantly, most of the evidence here follows Elias in locating the key drop in actual rates of violence back in the sixteenth and above all seventeenth centuries.
Brownlees begins with the occasional news pamphlets in the early seventeenth century before moving to the corantos of the 1620s.
The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century consists of twenty-six chapters that have been written by a team of international experts on early modern British philosophy.
A Study Of Major Political Thinkers In France From The Seventeenth To The Twentieth Century
Written in an engaging and comfortable style for the non-specialist reader, Music And Ideas In The Sixteenth And Seventeenth Centuries is a fascinating history of how musicians and musicologists were caught up amid warring ideas about religion, science, education, economy, and government in the era of the Reformation.
Ruisdael's Haarlem series is fascinating in another respect: The paintings are consonant with new attitudes that emerged in the seventeenth century toward the natural world.
Salinger's primary exception to this emphasis is her analysis of the divide between the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
In his classic study of the literature of art, Julius von Schlosser aptly called Giovan Pietro Bellori (1613-96) "the most important historiographer of art not only of Rome, but of all Italy, even of Europe, in the seventeenth century.
Few people anywhere in the seventeenth century believed in religious liberty as a principle for all people.