seventeen

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seventeen

1. the cardinal number that is the sum of ten and seven and is a prime number
2. a numeral, 17, XVII, etc., representing this number
3. the amount or quantity that is seven more than ten

Seventeen

novel of young love. [Am. Lit.: Booth Tarkington Seventeen in Magill I, 882]
References in classic literature ?
In the ninth, tenth, and seventeenth paragraphs the same proceeding was, in a greater or less degree, found to be necessary.
Elegant buffets made by Boulle, also purchased by the auctioneer, furnished the sides of the room, at the end of which sparkled the brass arabesques inlaid in tortoise-shell of the first tall clock that reappeared in the nineteenth century to claim honor for the masterpieces of the seventeenth.
I dare to say that a not large percentage of youths, in the formative stage of fifteen to seventeen, could have survived the stress of heavy drinking that I survived between my fifteenth and seventeenth years; that a not large percentage of men could have punished the alcohol I have punished in my manhood years and lived to tell the tale.
Thus in twilight ends the life of the greatest lyric poet of the seventeenth century.
The King family had the honour of entertaining the Governor's wife to tea on February the seventeenth.
Of this the enquirers of the seventeenth century, who to themselves appeared to be working out independently the enquiry into all truth, were unconscious.
Arnold would in all probability receive the telegram at Baden, on the next day, September the seventeenth.
It is dated July seventeenth, but is without address.
In the seventeenth century a certain David Fabricius boasted of having seen with his own eyes the inhabitants of the moon.
Only," said he, "it is no longer the sentimental card of the seventeenth century, it is the card of life, very neatly divided into two parts, one feminine, the other masculine; the right hemisphere for woman, the left for man.
Perhaps I may venture to add that personally I find it advisable to pass hastily over the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and so gain as much time as possible for the nineteenth.
When the visitor has mounted the crumbling steps of this ancient donjon, he reaches a little plateau where, in the seventeenth century, Georges Philibert de Sequigny, Lord of the Glandier, Maisons-Neuves and other places, built the existing town in an abominably rococo style of architecture.