Sharecroppers

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Sharecroppers

 

tenant farmers, chiefly in the southern part of the USA, who work under the direction and supervision of the landowner or his agent. The plots of land held by the tenants are often part of large capitalist farms. Sharecroppers represent only the labor force; the land and the entire fixed and working capital belong to the landowner, who is also the owner of the final product. In accord with the contract, the landowner is to deliver part of the harvest to the sharecroppers.

References in periodicals archive ?
28] A black sharecropper whose crops had been stolen by his landlord in Red River Parish reflected this new mood when he appealed to the Department of Justice for help.
It is, now, being resisted in many diverse ways by both the sharecropper and the landlord.
BETSEY COPELAND, DEBBY EGGER, AND VIRGINIA FOREMAN: the sharecroppers
The son of poor sharecroppers, young Audie Murphy (playing himself) enlists in the army after being rejected by the marines and the paratroopers.
As the need for sharecroppers declined, it became more difficult for Afro-American to find jobs in the county.
The reason blacks accepted the bargain of the sharecropper system, as white people tell it, was not that they could get no decent land to farm, but that they, practically alone among all the peoples in the world, lacked the basic ability to manage a simple agrarian way of life on their own.
Sharecropper (a linocut created in 1957, and printed in 1970) embodies many of the issues faced by Elizabeth Catlett throughout her life.
Howlin Wolf was born in 1910 as a poverty-stricken sharecropper in Mississippi who began his career singing for two decades in juke joints with the first Delta blues stars: James Segrest and Mark Hoffman's Moanin' At Midnight: The Life And Times Of Howlin' Wolf provides a powerful definitive biography of the blues musician which delves into his early years.
Presenter Aoife has been visiting old slave huts and sharecropper shacks, a reminder of how tough life was and still is for many in Mississippi and Louisiana.
Forty-seven-year-old Garedipanchan sharecropper Dhira Bhoi sits outside his hut as the heavens open.