sharp

(redirected from sharp practice)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

sharp

1. Music
a. denoting a note that has been raised in pitch by one chromatic semitone
b. (of an instrument, voice, etc.) out of tune by being or tending to be too high in pitch
2. Music
a. an accidental that raises the pitch of the following note by one chromatic semitone.
b. a note affected by this accidental
3. any medical instrument with sharp point or edge, esp a hypodermic needle

Sharp

Cecil (James). 1859--1924, British musician, best known for collecting, editing, and publishing English folk songs

sharp

(character)
References in periodicals archive ?
People now are fond of calling that cheating but that is a very emotive word and this kind of sharp practice has been a part of football since the idea of kicking a ball around was first mooted.
While I could see some fairness to taking weekend bookings only, I think demanding a three-night booking is sharp practice and unfair on overseas racegoers, who generally make up a large part of the attendance on the Friday and Saturday.
Avoid the appearance of conflict of interest, for it fosters a public perception of dishonesty at worst and sharp practice at best.
As the housing boom marks a return of ruthless practices such as gazumping, Office of Fair Trading (OFT) watchdog John Bridgeman is appealing for evidence from home-buyers of the latest sharp practice designed to exploit the homes market.
This is very sharp practice by the firms that run hospital car parks and totally wrong.
The council needs to stop this type of sharp practice and get the tape measure out.
This year too we have seen the use of tactics that can only be described as sharp practice which does nothing to enhance landlord tenant relations.
He of the scrubbing brush hair who looks as though he's been plugged into the electric light socket has made many a boxer's hair stand on end with sharp practice.
Rangers and Celtic are not doing anything on a scale that could be called sharp practice, but this is a system whichisopen to far-reaching abuse - and it needs to be cleaned up or scrapped.
All types of cheating or any sharp practice is against the spirit of the game, including to appeal for an LBW knowing the batsman is not out.
What she does discover is an appalling catalogue of sharp practice and downright illegality.
It is disgraceful that this sharp practice is being carried out in the NHS.