shawm


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shawm

(shôm), double-reed woodwind instrument used in Europe from the 13th through the 17th cent. The term denotes a family of instruments of different sizes. The shape and tone of the soprano shawm are comparable to those of the oboeoboe
[Ital., from Fr. hautbois] or hautboy
, woodwind instrument of conical bore, its mouthpiece having a double reed. The instruments possessing these general characteristics may be referred to as the oboe family, which includes the English horn, the bassoon,
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, of which it is a precursor. The shawm was constructed from a single piece of wood that was conically bored. Shawm-type instruments exist in many parts of the world, some of them with cognate names, such as the Turkish zurna.
References in periodicals archive ?
19) An indigenous saying captures this commonality of style: "a fine Burmese shawm player can articulate the smoothness between notes as if it were the violin" (my translation).
Carpaccio, perhaps in acknowledgment of Turkish custom, shows the shawms accompanied by a cylindrical bass drum of the kind from which they are practically inseparable in Turkey today, and also correctly represents at least two musicians playing shawms within the depicted musical ensembles (one musician was needed to sustain the drone while at least one other played the tune).
The viewer's eyes are almost immediately drawn to the stone blocks of the city wall that appear to be suspended in midair, as does the open book with musical notation from which the shawm player would presumably be reading.
But some, such as the shawm, curtal, crumhorn and lute, seem more exotic.
Wainwright, "Introduction: From 'Renaissance' to 'Baroque'"; Bruce Haynes, "Baptiste's Hautbois: The Metamorphosis from Shawm to Hautboy in France, 1620-1670"; Marc Ecochard, "A Commentary on the Letter by Michel de la Barre Concerning the History of Musettes and Hautboys"; Jan Bouterse, "The Woodwind Instruments of Richard Haka (1645/6-1705)"; Graham Lyndon-Jones, "Basstals or Curtoons: The Search for a Transitional Fagott"; Anthony Rowland-Jones, "The Iconographic Background to the Seventeenth-Century Recorder"; Nancy Hadden, "The Renaissance Flute in the Seventeenth Century"; Mary Oleskiewicz, "The Flute at Dresden: Ramifications for Eighteenth-Century Woodwind Performance in Germany"; Peter Trevelyan, "How Did Seventeenth-Century English Violins Really Sound?
As always, the vocal ensemble Alamire is in excellent form, though the contributions from the cornet, shawm, and sackbut ensemble Quintessential are all too few and brief.
Particularly fascinating for its report on "individuals" is the 75-page "register of musicians" at the end of the book: it presents, with full documentary support, hundreds of cathedral singers, wind players, cathedral organists and organ builders, palace trumpeters and shawm players, town criers, drummers, and other palace instrumentalists.
King's alleged accomplices - Lawrence Brewer, 31, and Shawm Berry, 23 - will be tried later.
Chris Green plays guitar, mandocello and piano accordion, while Jude Rees provides oboe, English bagpipes, shawm and recorder with Sophie Matthews playing English bagpipes, rauschpfeife, shawm, recorder and flute.
The Romani mahala (neighborhood) of this town is known for its musicians, who specialize in zurna (a double-reed conical-bore shawm or oboe) and dauli (a large cylindrical, two-headed drum played with sticks).
He is now one winner ahead of Fallon, who struck on his first British ride for David Loder, Shawm, ironically in the colours of Frankie's boss Sheik Mohammed.
Their appearance next Thursday at The Maudslay pub, Allesley Old Road, is supported by local duo Sophie Matthews and Tony Millyard, playing festive upbeat medieval and renaissance music on a variety of authentic instruments including hurdy-gurdy, rauschpfeife, curtal, shawm and Flemish bagpipes.