shell shock


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shell shock

loss of sight, memory, etc., resulting from psychological strain during prolonged engagement in warfare
References in periodicals archive ?
Myers, for example, determined that the effects of the disease were not physical but psychological, and he convinced British officials to develop specialist hospitals in the United Kingdom for individuals who suffered the most severe cases of shell shock.
We assume that anyone who was in that position [to be executed] was there because he fled because he had shell shock.
Families argued that their long-lost relatives were suffering from shell shock and that their executions were a grave miscarriage of justice.
reshapes the very shell shock discourses that flow across the postwar
violent and terrifying postwar present emphasizes that shell shock alone
75; Frederick Painton, "There is No Such Thing as Shell Shock," Reader's Digest 43 (Oct.
In fact, since its emergence seemed as sudden as that of the war itself, shell shock was treated with a caution at first, which often mutated into suspicion.
Sufferers of shell shock were seen as to not fit this mould, and so conclusions were drawn that they were unusual and perhaps had pre-existing conditions.
The offences for which they were executed were abolished by Parliament in 1929 and it is now recognised that they suffered shell shock and should not have paid the penalty.
The family has accepted that it is unlikely to overturn Pte Farr's conviction but are still fighting for a conditional pardon because of his shell shock.
He told the judge: "It is essential to our case that someone who only a year before had undergone five months of treatment for shell shock should not have been executed.
He said: "It is essential to our case that someone who only a year before had undergone five months of treatment for shell shock should not been executed.