shell-and-tube exchanger

shell-and-tube exchanger

[¦shel ən ¦tüb iks′chān·jər]
(engineering)
A device for the transfer of heat from a hot fluid to a cooler fluid; one fluid passes through a group (bundle) of tubes, the other passes around the tubes, through a surrounding shell. Also known as tubular exchanger.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the shell-and-tube exchanger is still by far the largest segment of the market, currently worth $1432 million, predicted to reach $1719 million by 1999.
There are well over 1,500 companies selling heat exchangers into the Western European market, and over 90 per cent of these predominantly manufacture shell-and-tube exchangers.
1957, "Flow Pattern for Predicting Shell-side Heat Transfer Coefficients for Baffled Shell-and-Tube Exchangers," Industrial And Engineering Chemistry.
The problem with using shell-and-tube exchangers for viscous products such as tomato paste, Bonner says, is that some of the tubes will be liable to clog.
Basically, shell-and-tube exchangers consist of a cylindrical shell containing a bundle of tubes running parallel to the shell.
This book focuses on the types of heat exchangers most widely used by industry, namely shell-and-tube exchangers (including condensers, reboilers and vaporizers), air-cooled heat exchangers and double-pipe (hairpin) exchangers.
The share of shell-and-tube exchangers will decline from 35 percent of total market revenues in 1994 to 30 percent by 2001 while those of most other varieties rise in the same period, forecasts the report, U.