shellac


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.

shellac,

solution of laclac,
resinous exudation from the bodies of females of a species of scale insect (Tachardia lacca), from which shellac is prepared. India is the chief source of shellac, although some is obtained from other areas in Southeast Asia.
..... Click the link for more information.
 in alcohol or acetone. In commerce the name is applied to the resinous substance (lac) itself rather than to the solution. It ranges in color from orange to light yellow depending upon the extent to which it has been purified; the darker shellacs are the less pure. When bleached it is known as white shellac. Applied to surfaces such as wood and plaster, the solution forms a hard coating upon evaporation of the solvent. Shellac is widely used as a spirit varnishvarnish,
homogeneous solution of gum or of natural or synthetic resins in oil (oil varnish) or in a volatile solvent (spirit varnish), which dries on exposure to air, forming a thin, hard, usually glossy film.
..... Click the link for more information.
, as a protective covering for drawings and plaster casts, for stiffening in the manufacture of felt hats, in making sealing wax, and in electrical insulation.

Shellac

A wood finisher and resin used in varnish, which produces a transparent shiny surface; often used to enhance and protect wood grain.

Shellac

 

a natural resin secreted by the lac insect, which parasitizes tropical and subtropical woody plants. Shellac apparently consists mainly of aliphatic polyhydroxy acids. It is freely soluble in alkalies and lower aliphatic alcohols, poorly soluble in benzene, and almost insoluble in gasoline, fats, and oils. Shellac is peeled off the tree bark, processed with hot water, melted, and filtered. It may be dark colored, orange, or light colored. Colorless shellac is obtained by bleaching the colored types with animal charcoal, bleaching powder, or sodium sulfate. Shellac has limited uses, principally in the manufacture of alcohol varnishes and polishes.

shellac

[shə′lak]
(materials)
A natural, alcohol-soluble, water-insoluble, flammable resin; made from lac resin deposited on tree twigs in India by the lac insect (Laccifer lecca) used as an ingredient of wood coatings.

shellac

A resin extracted and purified from matter secreted by insects; dissolved in alcohol or a similar solvent in the manufacture of shellac varnish.

shellac

1. a yellowish resin secreted by the lac insect, esp a commercial preparation of this used in varnishes, polishes, and leather dressings
2. a varnish made by dissolving shellac in ethanol or a similar solvent
References in periodicals archive ?
Product Active materials Mold Strip[R] Alkaline-based cleaner SafFoam[R] Alkaline concentrated cleaner Fit[R] Organic[TM] Water, organic ethanol, organic Fruit & Vegetable sunflower oil, organic glycerin, Wash potassium hydroxide, organic grapefruit seed oil Rebel Green[R] Plant oils, polysorbate-20, grapefruit Fruit & Veggie Wash seed extract, lemon-orange extract Environne[R] Oils, polysorbate-20, grapefruit seed extract, lemon-orange extract Veggie Wash[R] Corn, palm, coconut, citrus oils, sodium citrate, glycerin, grapefruit seed extract Decco Wax[R] Carnauba wax, emulsifier, food grade shellac, silicone, non-ionic antifoam Shellac[R] Emulsifier, food grade shellac Clorox[R] 6.
Shellac was obtained from Indian Institute of Natural Resin and Gums (IINRG), Ranchi, India.
During the first half of the twentieth century, shellac discs influenced the dissemination of popular genres (jazz, blues, and country music).
STAR APPEAL: Rihanna (left) and a close-up of her Shellac nails.
Shellac can be obtained in fine plates from the stores selling paint and wood-protection products.
A 1-L flask equipped with a mechanical stirrer, Dean-Stark trap, reflux condenser and thermometer was charged with shellac (60.
Instead of measuring radiation, the group adapted their optical metrology system to map the grooves pressed in shellac phonograph discs, by way of a digital camera attached to a microscope with coaxial illumination.
In collaboration with Kitasato University, the company has confirmed that the powder or extract of shellac can inhibit the production of interleukin-8, one of the causing factors of skin disorders.
After decorating, pieces can be sealed and made water-resistant by coating with shellac or varnish.
They have an extensive product range including gums, waxes, shellac, colours, calcium carbonate, lecithin and many other functional ingredients.
offers Ko 143 Hard Wax Plus, a colored synthetic shellac filler, developed for quick repairs that can withstand severe use.
As an alternative to alcohol-based shellac glazes currently used by candy makers, water-based WPI coatings-when plasticized with sucrose-are able to provide gloss to chocolates.