shellcode


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shellcode

Malware programming code that is injected covertly into the computer. The term originated from code that activates a command shell to exploit the computer (see command processor) but may refer to any machine language embedded in data that is used to compromise either the local machine or a remote machine. "English shellcode" intersperses bits and pieces of command statements within a large segment of normal English text. The pieces are decoded into formal shell commands by a Trojan. See shell script.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mike's extensive experience spans nearly 15 years of infosec-related R&D, during which he has published contributed to the titles "Hacking Exposed Mobile 1st Edition," "Hacking Exposed 7th Edition" and "Sockets, Shellcode, Porting & Coding.
It seems that no exploit, shellcode or nasty payload are inside.
lt;p>Miller's attack doesn't actually pop up shellcode -- the basic software attackers use as a stepping stone to launch their own programs on a hacked machine -- but it lets him control the instructions that are within the phone's processor.
Chapters discuss assembly and shellcode, stack exploits, heap exploits, format string exploits, and security coding.
From understanding and writing shellcode to using format strings, Nessus code and more, WRITING SECURITY TOOLS AND EXPLOITS is a guide no code programmer can live without.
Another possible future technique to be aware of is polymorphic shellcode exploit attacks.
Sockets, Shellcode, porting & coding; reverse engineering exploits and tool coding for security professionals.
What: "Multiplatform iPhone, Android Shellcode and other smart phone insecurities"
The errors allow an attacker to infect SMM memory and inject shellcode of their choice into it, they said.
The most common attack was the use of shellcode to run a Trojan horse downloader that downloaded additional payload code over HTTP.
The combination of Sourcefire's MS06-040 rules, released in 2006, its MS08-067 rules, released on October 23, 2008, and the company's generic shellcode detection rules delivered multiple layers of protection against Conficker, even before it was released in late November 2008.
ThreatSentry supports single or multiple server environments and protects against an array of documented exploitive techniques including Directory Traversal, Parameter Manipulation, Buffer Overflow, Parser Evasion, High-bit Shellcode, Printer Protocol, and Remote Data Services, but also stops any unusual activity falling outside acceptable patterns of use.