sherry


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sherry

[from Jérez], naturally dry fortified wine, pale amber to brown in tint. The term sherry originally referred to wines made from grapes grown in the region of Jérez de la Frontera, Andalusia, Spain; today it may refer to any of the fortified wines from S Spain and is also applied to similar wines produced in the United States, Latin America, and South Africa. After fermentation the wine is fortified with brandy. Matured in cask for several years, the wine when mature is classed as palma, very dry; raya, full and rich; or palo cortado, an intermediate variation. The big sherry houses blend the wines with reserves from the Soleras, collections of flavoring wines from very fine vintages, kept in dated casks and maintained for long periods by exact replenishment of the blending wine withdrawn from the oldest cask with wine from the next oldest. The varieties of sherry include amontillado and manzanilla, apéritif wines of the palma type; the fairly sweet, fruity oloroso and amoroso, blended from palo cortado; and the very sweet golden or brown sherries, raya blends. The dessert sherries are usually colored and sweetened by the addition of dark, syrupy wines. Sherry contains from 15% to 23% alcohol, the more highly fortified wines being for export. Sherry must be long matured in wood and bottle to acquire the mellowness demanded of brandied wines. It is a widely used flavoring in fine cookery.

Sherry

 

a strong wine made from different varieties of grapes. The alcoholic content is about 20 percent by volume; the sugar content is about 3 percent. Sherry is prepared by allowing dry fortified wine to mature under a film formed on the surface by a special sherry yeast. In five or six months about one-third of the wine is removed from under the film and replaced by new wine. The wine that was removed is mixed with table and dessert wines and then allowed to mature longer, from two months to two years. The best known Spanish sherries are fino, amontillado, and oloroso.

Sherries are produced in the USSR in Armenia, Moldavia, the Crimea, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenia. In addition to strong sherry, a dry table wine of the sherry type, containing 14 percent alcohol by volume, is produced.

sherry

[′sher·ē]
(food engineering)
A dry to sweet fortified wine with nutty flavor and ranging from pale to dark amber in color.

sherry

dry fortified wine, originally made from grapes grown in Andalusia, Spain. [Span. Hist.: NCE, 2501]
See: Wine

sherry

a fortified wine, originally from the Jerez region in S Spain, usually drunk as an apéritif
References in classic literature ?
Flambeau did not understand the sherry, but he did not object to it in the least.
But for a glass or two of sherry, I don't think I could have had my mind so much upon the stretch as it has been.
This was a bold figure of speech, but not exactly the right thing; for, unhappily, the pat opening had slipped away--even couplets from Pope may be but "fallings from us, vanishings," when fear clutches us, and a glass of sherry is hurrying like smoke among our ideas.
In the pint decanter of sherry, not a drop remained.
With your leave, I'll take another drop of the sherry wine.
Tom had likewise been propitiated, by being allowed to bring his three bosom friends, who went by the school-boy names of Rumple, Sherry, and Spider.
Well--here is Blanche's health" (he took some of the wine himself), "in the weakest sherry I ever drank in my life.
She lifted the sherry bottle tentatively for his consent.
bring a clean glass, and hand the sherry to this gentleman--and hand it round, will you, waiter?
Rebecca received their congratulations with perfect modesty; ordered a bottle of sherry and a bread cake to the little dingy lodgings where she dwelt, while conducting the business, to treat the enemy's lawyers: shook hands with them at parting, in excellent good humour, and returned straightway to the Continent, to rejoin her husband and son and acquaint the former with the glad news of his entire liberation.
I tried the dining-room, and discovered Samuel with a biscuit and a glass of sherry, silently investigating the empty air.
Bounderby (whom he just knew by sight), at lunch on chop and sherry.