sherry


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sherry

[from Jérez], naturally dry fortified wine, pale amber to brown in tint. The term sherry originally referred to wines made from grapes grown in the region of Jérez de la Frontera, Andalusia, Spain; today it may refer to any of the fortified wines from S Spain and is also applied to similar wines produced in the United States, Latin America, and South Africa. After fermentation the wine is fortified with brandy. Matured in cask for several years, the wine when mature is classed as palma, very dry; raya, full and rich; or palo cortado, an intermediate variation. The big sherry houses blend the wines with reserves from the Soleras, collections of flavoring wines from very fine vintages, kept in dated casks and maintained for long periods by exact replenishment of the blending wine withdrawn from the oldest cask with wine from the next oldest. The varieties of sherry include amontillado and manzanilla, apéritif wines of the palma type; the fairly sweet, fruity oloroso and amoroso, blended from palo cortado; and the very sweet golden or brown sherries, raya blends. The dessert sherries are usually colored and sweetened by the addition of dark, syrupy wines. Sherry contains from 15% to 23% alcohol, the more highly fortified wines being for export. Sherry must be long matured in wood and bottle to acquire the mellowness demanded of brandied wines. It is a widely used flavoring in fine cookery.

Sherry

 

a strong wine made from different varieties of grapes. The alcoholic content is about 20 percent by volume; the sugar content is about 3 percent. Sherry is prepared by allowing dry fortified wine to mature under a film formed on the surface by a special sherry yeast. In five or six months about one-third of the wine is removed from under the film and replaced by new wine. The wine that was removed is mixed with table and dessert wines and then allowed to mature longer, from two months to two years. The best known Spanish sherries are fino, amontillado, and oloroso.

Sherries are produced in the USSR in Armenia, Moldavia, the Crimea, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenia. In addition to strong sherry, a dry table wine of the sherry type, containing 14 percent alcohol by volume, is produced.

sherry

[′sher·ē]
(food engineering)
A dry to sweet fortified wine with nutty flavor and ranging from pale to dark amber in color.

sherry

dry fortified wine, originally made from grapes grown in Andalusia, Spain. [Span. Hist.: NCE, 2501]
See: Wine

sherry

a fortified wine, originally from the Jerez region in S Spain, usually drunk as an apéritif
References in classic literature ?
It thundered some foreign name loudly but inaudibly, and the hotel proprietor moved more sharply towards it than he had done for Flambeau's sherry.
But he reflected that head cooks are proverbially arrogant; and, besides, the host had come back with the sherry, and that was the great thing.
Flambeau, who had sat on the long iron seat to finish his sherry, put it down and rose to his feet, staring at his friend in amazement.
Maud and her bosom friend, "Gwace," were seated on tin cake-boxes; Sherry and Spider adorned the refrigerator; while Tom and Rumple foraged for the party.
Sherry, cut into the kitchen, and bring a cup of coffee.
In the pint decanter of sherry, not a drop remained.
They remembered, likewise, the good feasts of London the profusion of ale and sherry with which the citizens of London paid their friends the soldiers; -- they looked with terror at the black war bread, at the troubled waters of the Tweed, -- too salt for the glass, not enough so for the pot; and they said to themselves, "Are not the roast meats kept warm for Monk in London?
Sherry gradually lays the foundations of her new life.
PC Linzi Sherry crashed while driving without insurance.
Former Paramount Pictures chairwoman Sherry Lansing was the first woman to run a major studio.
Sherry is the unconventional daughter of Dumpling, a mother who has lived a hardscrabble life and whose ancestors include both African Americans and Native Americans who endured slavery.
Thomas Lowndes is spearheading the development of innovative new products using alcohol that have been launched by its customers for this Christmas, including the first ever use of Harveys[R] Bristol Cream[R] sherry in custard and an overtly branded range of butter and creams using stunning brand imagery.