short antenna

short antenna

[′shȯrt an‚ten·ə]
(electromagnetism)
An antenna shorter than about one-tenth of a wavelength, so that the current may be assumed to have constant magnitude along its length, and the antenna may be treated as an elementary dipole.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Ibiza is smart, neat and sporty, with a lovely little nose and a stylish sweep to the rear, with its spoiler and short antenna.
Nevertheless, Falbouria has normal wing venation, quite bristly legs including strong anterior preapicals on mid and hind femora, short antenna and simple tarsi (Parent 1933).
Unfortunately, while the coupling process electrically compensates for a physically short antenna it also reduces effective radiated power of the radio as shown.
are 7-ounce palm-size half-watt transceivers with a short antenna.
And where each short antenna joins the head, there' s an opening.
An electrically short antenna element (whip or dipole half) looks slightly capacitive (e.
For example, The unit has a stub antenna, because consumers thought the short antenna was sturdier than retractable or longer antenna.
This characteristic is new for electrically short antenna design and results in the designer making tradeoffs for overall system optimization.
The object of this contract is the design of services and monitoring of the work for the realization of a replacement building of a residential care center Sint-Job nursing home with 115 residential units, 3 residential units and a center for short antenna function Local Service Centre.
The ideal gain was reduced by the SWR loss, the roll-off in elevation and the antenna efficiency (fractional power radiation resistance/input resistance) for the electrically short antennas.
Hansen concludes that four areas appear to offer performance advantages: (1) arrays above 5 GHz will certainly benefit from low resistance; (2) the matching of electrically short antennas, both small (high frequency) and large (low frequency), will permit significant efficiency improvements; (3) and (4) application of thin film slow-wave structures in phasers and traveling wave arrays also are potential applications that could profit from superconductivity.