Dyspnea

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dyspnea

[′dis·nē·ə]
(medicine)
Difficult or labored breathing.

Dyspnea

 

disruption of the rate and depth of respiration, accompanied by the sensation of shortness of breath.

Cardiac patients experience dyspnea both while physically exerting themselves and while subsequently resting in the horizontal position. Their condition is complicated by orthopnea, the inability to breathe except in a sitting position. In patients with cardiac diseases, attacks of severe dyspnea, which usually occur at night, are a symptom of cardiac asthma. In such cases, the dyspnea is inspiratory; that is, the patient finds it difficult to inhale. Expiratory dyspnea, difficulty in exhaling, arises when the lumina of the small bronchi and bronchioles are narrowed, as in bronchial asthma. It also arises when the elasticity of the lung tissue is lost, as in chronic emphysema of the lungs. Cerebral dyspnea is a result of direct irritation of the cerebral respiratory center by such abnormalities as tumors and hemorrhages.

References in periodicals archive ?
2] at each participant's residence and self-reported wheezing (in the last year for UK Biobank, at any time for Lifelines; yes/no) and shortness of breath (when walking on level ground for UK Biobank, at rest for Lifelines, with no time period specified for either study; yes/no).
Gudi notes that pulmonary rehabilitation programs, which include exercise, education, and support, can be critical in restoring exercise capacity, decreasing shortness of breath, and improving quality of life.
Using serum CRP concentrations determined on all study participants, comparisons were performed between the non-asthmatic/no shortness of breath individuals and those participants who were diagnosed asthmatics/symptomatic undiagnosed asthmatics.
Almost one third of study participants had a lung complaint, usually cough (in 23%) or shortness of breath on exertion (in 16%); 3% had shortness of breath at rest.
For patients, increased awareness of shortness of breath as a possible cardiac symptom will hopefully prompt those with unexplained shortness of breath to see their doctor sooner rather than later.
There are several serious conditions that can cause shortness of breath, and heart problems are among those that have to be considered a likely possibility.
He experienced some shortness of breath on Saturday morning and has had a bad cold, which could be the cause for the shortness of breath.
According to a spokesperson for Antibody Assay Laboratories, which provides services to health care providers, "These chemicals off-gas into the environment, polluting indoor air with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can create symptoms from itchy eyes to shortness of breath, headaches and nausea.
The results can include coughing, mucous, shortness of breath, emphysema, and cancer.
I would take the shortness of breath seriously since most healthy people who are not overtraining don't often get short of breath running in general.
It can be very disconcerting for a finely conditioned triathlete to experience a shortness of breath when swimming, yet can breathe effortlessly when running or biking.
We studied a 25-year-old man with a pierced tongue, who arrived at Memorial Health University Medical Center with fever, chills, rigors, and shortness of breath of 6 days' duration and had an aortic valvuloplasty for correction of congenital aortic stenosis.