shtetl


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shtetl

any small-town Jewish settlement in East Europe. [Jewish Hist.: Wigoder, 552]
References in periodicals archive ?
To what extent is the novel Shtetl Love Song autobiographical?
Kacyzne's pictures of shtetl life, in Zemel's view, "confirmed a sense of diaspora community for Forverts readers, and created a seemingly unmediated ethnography of a former Eastern European 'home,' but the recurrent rhythm of their appearance over five years [by the end of the decade, much to Kacyzne's disappointment, Cahan abruptly ended Kacyzne's photographic reporting assignment] delivers an ambivalent meta-narrative that is at once ideal in its picturesqueness and socially critical.
Their hitherto unknown "confessions," if treated with due skepticism, yield a more nuanced understanding of the nineteenth-century shtetl and contribute much to a bourgeoning field.
Consequentemente, se Lista pode ser interpretada enquanto o arconte do shtetl, sua casa se transforma em um "Arkheion grego" (DERRIDA, 2001)--a casa do registro, da memoria, o domicilio onde reside o arconte e seus arquivos.
In this respect Veidlinger's book differs from Anna Shternshis's pioneering study Soviet and Kosher, whose subjects were former shtetl Jews who lived either in Moscow or in emigration at the time when they were interviewed.
Never mind the absence of Sephardi or Mizrahi Jews, modern Israel or Zionism, or references to any other time or place in Jewish history; for the past fifty years, a professionally constructed Broadway musical about the singing denizens of a fictional eastern European shtetl has served as a teaching tool and constructed identity for Jews and non-Jews alike.
TTie reasons for this know ledge gap are complex: Our parents', grandparents' or even great-grandparents' memories did not extend back far enough; Yiddish literature developed after what Petrovsky-Shtern calls the Golden Age Shtetl was already long past; the paucity of sources in the wake of the Holocaust and the ensuing Soviet period made historical accounts of this era difficult to reconstruct, and finally--I believe, although Petrovsky-Shtem does not claim this--the sheer improbability of a Golden Age in the home country did not lit in the narrative of the immigrant Jewish experience.
The topics are leaving the shtetl, from haskalah to positivism, young Dubnow as a Jewish positivist, coping with new realities, Romantic positivism, the historian become a nationalist, from the 19th to the 20th century, and reconsiderations.
Everything "exilic" was beneath contempt: The Jewish shtetl (town), Jewish religion, Jewish prejudices and superstitions.
But his mood changes when he's forced to compromise his religious beliefs as modern attitudes encroach upon his shtetl.
I analyze the bookplate, or ex libris, as an unlikely record of the way in which the idealized picture of the shtetl Jew crossed over from Eastern European immigrants' hands into those of native-born German Jews.
For historians today, many of these questions show the existence of different popular beliefs that were never documented elsewhere and that were often forgotten after the collapse of the shtetl culture in the Pale of Settlement following the collapse of the Russian Empire and, later, the Holocaust.