shutter speed

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shutter speed

In a still camera, the length of time that the shutter is open, exposing the film (analog) or CCD or CMOS sensor (digital) to light for a single image. In a camcorder, the shutter speed is the frame speed; for example, 24, 30 or 60 frames per second (fps). See exposure and shutter lag.
References in periodicals archive ?
Users can control shutter speeds between 1/500s and 1s along with the ISO option (100-2000).
When photographing small, quick-moving birds that are never still for more than a second, fast shutter speeds and a burst of frames are required to get crisp, sharply focused images.
Slower shutter speeds allow more light to strike the sensor.
Aperture Priority and Shutter Priority settings let you experiment with shutter speeds and depth of field, so you can shoot fast-moving images in low light.
suppress hand-shake vibration for shooting at slow shutter speeds.
Shooting in low light almost always means using very slow shutter speeds, much slower than 1/30 of a second.
There are several simple ways to put such implied movement into our images: We can combine slow shutter speeds with fast-moving subjects, we can pan the camera along with a moving subject to blur its background, or we can contrast subjects in motion with subjects that remain still.
There is no such thing as a 'perfect' exposure: it's up to photographers to thoroughly understand the process and take advantage of the techniques which lend to better photos, which goes far beyond the usual focus on f-stops and shutter speeds.
In these instances, shooting in progressive mode could yield significant quality benefits over interlaced modes, even at slow shutter speeds and in scenes with limited motion.
The FinePix F10 requires little light when recording images, which enables the realization of faster shutter speeds.
That stuff aside, the DB200s have the same specs as the DB100: namely, shutter speeds of 1/8,000 sec to 1/30 sec, the ability to take five continuous shots per second (for two seconds) and attach eight-second voice memos to each picture, a rechargeable lithium ion battery to supply the juice and a USB interface for transferring the snaps.
Today's cameras have shutter speeds that can open and close in a fraction of a second.