shy


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shy

1. Poker (of a player) without enough money to back his bet
2. (of plants and animals) not breeding or producing offspring freely
References in classic literature ?
I was about to try a shy at the weather, for a saving change, when the girl slipped in ahead of me and said:
She was not struck by any thing remarkably clever in Miss Smith's conversation, but she found her altogether very engagingnot inconveniently shy, not unwilling to talkand yet so far from pushing, shewing so proper and becoming a deference, seeming so pleasantly grateful for being admitted to Hartfield, and so artlessly impressed by the appearance of every thing in so superior a style to what she had been used to, that she must have good sense, and deserve encouragement.
Conversation however was not wanted, for Sir John was very chatty, and Lady Middleton had taken the wise precaution of bringing with her their eldest child, a fine little boy about six years old, by which means there was one subject always to be recurred to by the ladies in case of extremity, for they had to enquire his name and age, admire his beauty, and ask him questions which his mother answered for him, while he hung about her and held down his head, to the great surprise of her ladyship, who wondered at his being so shy before company, as he could make noise enough at home.
Because you're such a queer, frightened, shy little thing.
Mary knew nothing about boys and she spoke to him a little stiffly because she felt rather shy.
It was one of Norah's peculiarities to shrink from all reconciliations that were openly ratified, and to take her shy refuge in reconciliations that were silently implied.
In those days, travellers were very shy of being confidential on a short notice, for anybody on the road might be a robber or in league with robbers.
she was as shy and shrinking as though she had nothing on,--she made a very pretty young man indeed.
His lame walk was rather slower than usual on this warm day, so Adam lingered behind when the bell rang for dinner, that he might walk up with his old friend; for he was a little too shy to join the Poyser party on this public occasion.
Yet still, ever after that sorrowful day, Whenever the Butcher was by, The Beaver kept looking the opposite way, And appeared unaccountably shy.
Astley was a man so shy, reserved, and taciturn in his manner that one might have looked for anything from him.
He was shy, and disposed to abstraction; but the engaging mildness of her countenance, and gentleness of her manners, soon had their effect; and Anne was well repaid the first trouble of exertion.