shy

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shy

1. Poker (of a player) without enough money to back his bet
2. (of plants and animals) not breeding or producing offspring freely
References in classic literature ?
One consolation that shy folk can take unto themselves is that shyness is certainly no sign of stupidity.
A man rarely carries his shyness past the hobbledehoy period.
Losing an umbrella, falling in love, toothache, black eyes, and having your hat sat upon may be mentioned as a few examples, but the chief of them all is shyness.
Jasper Dale, under all his shyness and aloofness, possessed a nature full of delicate romance and poesy, which, denied expression in the common ways of life, bloomed out in the realm of fancy and imagination.
She liked him very much; she thought his nature beautiful in its simplicity and purity; in spite of his shyness she felt more delightfully at home in his society than in that of any other person she had ever met.
How much I love you, Alice," Jasper Dale was saying, unafraid, with no shyness in voice or manner.
He came close to her and drew her into his arms, tenderly and reverently, all his shyness and awkwardness swallowed up in the grace of his great happiness.
Levin suddenly blushed, not as grown men blush, slightly, without being themselves aware of it, but as boys blush, feeling that they are ridiculous through their shyness, and consequently ashamed of it and blushing still more, almost to the point of tears.
His face all at once took an expression of anger from the effort he was making to surmount his shyness.
Laurie sat bold upright, and meekly took her empty plate feeling an odd sort of pleasure in having `little Amy' order him about, for she had lost her shyness now, and felt an irrestible desire to trample on him, as girls have a delightful way of doing when lords of creation show any signs of subjection.
Though, to be sure, from the small number of English whalers, such meetings do not very often occur, and when they do occur there is too apt to be a sort of shyness between them; for your Englishman is rather reserved, and your Yankee, he does not fancy that sort of thing in anybody but himself.
He was too diffident to do justice to himself; but when his natural shyness was overcome, his behaviour gave every indication of an open, affectionate heart.