Sibilant

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Sibilant

 

a front fricative consonant, such as [s] or [z], produced by forcing the air stream through the narrow round opening formed when the edges of the front part of the upper surface of the tongue are pressed against the side teeth. Depending on how and to what extent the front part of the tongue is involved, linguists distinguish retroflex (cacuminal), apical, and dorsal sibilants. Dorsal sibilants are found in Russian.

References in periodicals archive ?
brain' -- contrasting notably with the dominant sibilance of 'An Elegy' -- celebrates the ability of the 'artistic touch' to compensate momentarily in the darkness (The Weather in Japan, p.
Majumdar utilised a whole range of techniques blowing into his three-foot long bass flute, creating viscous phrases in vibrant low tones, then moving up to his smallest flutes, usually reserved for the climactic section of each raga, vast-tonguing complicated figures at high speed, employing a very aggressive sibilance.
It's one thing to say, for example, that there was no sibilance on the "s" sounds, but it was more than that, seeming to eliminate the microphone from the recording process.
The unwelcome emergence of desire for Mary is depicted in especially harsh terms, as the speaker's scientific "yearnings so sublime," with their harmonious sibilance, are violently disrupted by an acoustically powerful predicate; they are "blasted" by the "hazel eyes and lips vermilion" that serve as the poem's first reference to Mary, a disturbing choice of phrasing that firmly connects her to the negative image of the body introduced in the first stanza.
Julie's voice was right on all three, with correct-sounding texture and sibilance.
The mix offers complexity and nuance, while being balanced towards the brighter side of things; on lesser systems, this can produce excessive vocal sibilance, and etched instrumentality.
Harsh string sound and sibilance on vocal sections is reduced.
And the sibilance I noticed on the prior cut was less apparent here.
Here, the treble balance was nearly perfect, with the added detail on quality recordings only occasionally offset by the sibilance of "juiced" pop recordings.
Then I'd swap over to the NEARs and find, yes, the sibilance was on the recording, but was not so prominently reproduced.