sickle

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Related to sickling: sickle cell anemia, sickling test, sickling crisis

sickle

an implement for cutting grass, corn, etc., having a curved blade and a short handle

Sickle

 

a hand implement consisting of a long, curved, slightly serrated blade and used for cutting grain. Sickles first appeared in the Neolithic and were initially used to cut wild plants. They were made of wood, bone, or clay and had a cutting edge consisting of small chips of flint, called microliths, set in a groove in a mounting. Sickles made entirely of flint date from the Aeneolithic. The first metal sickles, made of bronze, appeared in the Bronze Age. Iron sickles, which appeared in the early Iron Age, were initially small and slightly curved. Later the shapes of sickles changed, becoming larger and more curved. In the USSR the sickle has survived only as a tool for small private farm plots.

sickle

[′sik·əl]
(agriculture)
The cutting mechanism of a binder, reaper, or combine.
(design engineering)
A hand tool consisting of a hooked metal blade with a short handle, used for cutting grain or other agricultural products.
(textiles)
A hooked arm for guiding the thread in a spinning mule.

Sickle

[′sik·əl]
(astronomy)
A group of six stars in the constellation Leo that outline the head of the lion.
References in periodicals archive ?
All the false negatives with the sickling test were cases of AS (carriers), not SS.
Urgent fluid replacement, plus oxygen to reverse the sickling could have averted the disaster, but the patient was under a general anaesthetic and nobody knew there was anything wrong until he woke up
I have been tested for Sickling but I don't know my phenotype through Haemoglobin Electrophoersis.
Once MX-1520 enters the bloodstream, it is biotransformed to vanillin, which easily passes through the red blood cell membrane, binds with sickle hemoglobin and prevents cell sickling.
Cordox, a natural sugar phosphate, acts to reduce the stickiness of these red blood cells resulting in the reversal of the sickling process.
A laboratory animal with sickle cell disease could offer new insights into the mechanisms of red-blood-cell sickling and serve as an ideal subject for experimental drugs.
This mutation causes the formation of sickle-shaped red blood cells, which are less deformable, more fragile and susceptible to hemolysis, leading to anemia and episodic vaso-occlusive crises and pain when sickling occurs and tissues are deprived of oxygen.
But shortly after birth, the body's hemoglobin-making system switches to produce adult hemoglobin, which will cause sickling in people with the disease.
Weiner envisions that this process, in addition to modifying the blood of patients with ischemic disease, could help transfusion patients with sickle cell disease, because their painful sickling occurs only when affected blood cells give up their oxygen.