side chain


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side chain

[′sīd ‚chān]
(organic chemistry)
A grouping of similar atoms (two or more, generally carbons, as in the ethyl radical, C2H5‒) that branches off from a straight-chain or cyclic (for example, benzene) molecule. Also known as branch; branched chain.
References in periodicals archive ?
One is that the gap of the backbone and side chain should be small enough to make it possible for electric interaction to take place, namely, having enough draw ratios, the other is that the trail phenyl of side chain should be close to carbonyls in imide rings of backbone since electric interactions only take place in small steric area.
When the amount of siloxane was small, the hydrophobic domain became relatively small, but the steric hinderance of side chains was already apparent.
To investigate the relative importance of grafting degree or length of PEO side chain on the ionic conductivity, we compared the room temperature conductivitie of the polymer electrolyte that have almost the same PEO content in the graft copolymer.
Another unexpected finding, says Tainer, is that peptide bonds, the backbone of the amino-acid chains, also interact with water molecules in the groovesas much as or even more than the most water-loving side chains.
PMMA, PTFEMA, PPhMA, and PPFPhMA showed four types of birefringence properties, even though they were all methacrylates and their molecular structures only differed in terms of the substituent R in the side chains, as shown in Fig.
The side chain of lysine 101 protrudes significantly away from the protein and is clearly solvent accessible.
g], reflecting the flexible nature of the alkenyl side chain.
Because the side chain of salmeterol is anchored at the exosite, the active head portion continually attaches to and detaches from the receptor site.
X-ray structural analyses show that the alkyl side chain heads internally toward the heme plate, where it comes to within 2.
In this case we would suggest a simple automatic side chain lubricating system.
The interrelationships between structure, antimicrobial activity, and side effects associated with various side chain positions of the quinolones are discussed here.
Many G proteins require the addition of either a 20-carbon side chain or a 15-carbon side chain to perform their function.