sidereal


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sidereal

1. of, relating to, or involving the stars
2. determined with reference to one or more stars

sidereal

(sÿ-deer -ee-ăl) Relating to or measured or determined with reference to the stars.

sidereal

[sī′dir·ē·əl]
(astronomy)
Referring to a quantity, such as time, to indicate that it is measured in relation to the apparent motion or position of the stars.

sidereal

Of or pertaining to the stars. Although sidereal generally refers to the stars and tropical to the vernal equinox, sidereal time and the sidereal day are based upon the position of the vernal equinox relative to the meridian. The sidereal year is based upon the stars.
References in periodicals archive ?
A stand placed flat on the ground aligned to geographic North, with a beam pointing down toward the ellipse marked by local time of day shows the direction of the Sidereal South Pole from San Francisco.
The goal of the Modified Sidereal Filter (MSF) is the elimination of all effects influencing the position solutions, which occur periodically with the satellite constellation (e.
I asked her whether sidereal astrology has more validity, given that its signs are astronomically in line with the constellations.
Sidereal is an odd term since it refers to stars or constellations.
Galileo's Sidereus nuncius, or, A sidereal message.
peripheral, sidelong, slightly sidereal view, as if a star the size of a
Anna Marciniak has used his data to confirm a sidereal period of just over 7.
One of the exhibits is a 1771 sidereal clock which Catherine the Great of Russia decided not to buy after having it on approval at St Petersburg.
The editor provides useful background on his life and works, from The Sidereal Messenger (1610) to excerpts from The Two New Sciences (1638).
The mirrors, symbols of private space, intimacy, and the reflective capacity of the self, seem like weightless planets suspended in sidereal darkness.
Through clear prose and with few (but important) endnotes, the introductory and eight primary chapters chronicle the changing representations and stakes of time, space, and motion in such influential works as Galileo's Sidereal Messenger, Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, Donne's First Anniversary, and Milton's Paradise Lost as much as to Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale; and to prose exposition, lyric, oration, and epic as much as to drama.