sieve analysis


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

sieve analysis

[′siv ə‚nal·ə·səs]
(engineering)
The size distribution of solid particles on a series of standard sieves of decreasing size, expressed as a weight percent. Also known as sieve classification; sieving.

sieve analysis, screen analysis

A determination of the proportions of particles lying within certain size ranges in a granular material by separation on sieves of different-size openings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sieve analysis Sieve number Sieve diameter (mm) Residue of sieving (gr) 3/8" 9,53 0 4 4,76 41,3 10 2 29,6 40 0,42 19,4 100 15,2 200 0,074 12,7 Pan 301,8 Sieve number Sieved (gr) Sieved percent, % 3/8" 420 100 4 378,7 90 10 349,1 83 40 329,7 79 100 314,5 75 200 301,8 72 Pan Table 2: Liquid limit and plastic limit experiments for natural soil and lime state.
Set of sieves used for sieve analysis and size classification Sieve number Sieve opening Size classification in mm 9 6.
Sieve analysis of granite sample Sieve Opening Weight of Weight of Weight of (mm) Sieve (g) Sieve & Sample Sample (g) Retained (g) 20.
Coarse powder granularity (particle size over 50 [micro]m) was evaluated by sieve analysis to ensure sufficiently good results.
Sieve analysis, the oldest particle sizing technique, remains very common, again due to lower cost and the simple approach.
which automates sieve analysis of dry granular material helps cut quality control costs.
Sieve Analyzer is designed to reduce the time and eliminate the operator error associated with sieve analysis.
This way it is possible to achieve near perfect agreement with traditional sieve analysis.
It covers such duties as sampling aggregates, determining earthwork density and performing tests like sieve analysis, sand equivalent, and asphalt extraction.
Gold assaying employs metallic sieve analysis of all massive sulphide intervals due to a component of coarse gold.
Sieve analysis, Hydrometer analysis, Moisture content, Specific gravity, Atterberg Limits for soil classification.
These disintegrated fine grains ultimately go into the finer fractions during sieve analysis, leaving the organic rich coal particles in the middle fractions.