sight

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Related to sighted: Short sighted, Far sighted

sight:

see visionvision,
physiological sense of sight by which the form, color, size, movements, and distance of objects are perceived. Vision in Humans

The human eye functions somewhat like a camera; that is, it receives and focuses light upon a photosensitive receiver, the retina.
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.

sight

[sīt]
(navigation)
(ordnance)
Mechanical or optical device for aiming a firearm or for laying a gun or launcher in position.
To aim at a target or aiming point.
(physiology)

sight

i. An optical device for the measurement of drift. See drift indicator.
ii. An aiming device for aiming weapons. It may be a part of a head-up display or a separate unit. It may be fixed, gyro, or electronic. See sight glass (iii).
iii. To make an observation of a heavenly body with a sextant.

sight

1. the power or faculty of seeing; perception by the eyes; vision
2. any of various devices or instruments used to assist the eye in making alignments or directional observations, esp such a device used in aiming a gun
3. an observation or alignment made with such a device
References in periodicals archive ?
Both blind groups performed comparably well--and markedly better than sighted participants did--at discerning sounds directly in flout of their bodies that came from different distances, ranging from a to 4 m.
In my view, the major differences between blind instructors and sighted instructors are those of philosophy, and these differences give rise to the differing techniques used by blind instructors and by sighted instructors and cause some of the problems encountered by blind instructors.
O&M specialists frequently spend a great deal of time teaching pre-cane techniques, sighted guide techniques, and protective methods.
Most people, blind and sighted alike, tend to do and become what others expect of them.
Most sighted people, unless extensively trained under sleepshades, do not believe that a blind person can traverse the many unfamiliar hazards that he or she might encounter daily.
A sighted instructor can watch the new cane user from a distance or hop in a car and observe the student in air-conditioned or heated comfort, while the blind instructor is out there with the student in all types of weather conditions, mentoring and tracking the new cane user.
The biggest problem that sighted specialists perceive for blind instructors is that we cannot see the environment in front of the student to protect him or her from tree limbs, construction, or other barriers.
Sighted specialists seem to believe that blind people need to be protected and are not able to do much really independent traveling.
In sighted volunteers, these neural tissues remained calm during the same verbal tests, say neuroscientist Ehud Zohary of Hebrew University in Jerusalem and his colleagues.