sinus

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Related to sigmoid sinus: straight sinus, transverse sinus

sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
On brain MR and MR venography performed urgently, thrombosis was found in the transverse and sigmoid sinus.
Mechanical clot aspiration and disruption were then performed in the left sigmoid sinus or transverse sinus (Fig 4).
A follow-up MRI at 8 months demonstrated left temporal encephalomalacia, partial recanalization of the left transverse sinus, sigmoid sinus, and left intemal jugular vein with no new focal lesions.
Computed tomography (CT) of the head and neck with contrast revealed a space-filling defect that was suspicious for right-sided sigmoid sinus thrombosis.
Osteomas can encroach onto vital structures such as the facial nerve and sigmoid sinus, as in our case, and extreme care must be taken to avoid violating these structures dur ing resection.
The sigmoid sinus was solid and filled with granulation tissue.
The mass extended posteriorly to, but did not involve, the sigmoid sinus lumen.
We examine the controversial roles that anticoagulation and thrombolysis play in Lemierre's syndrome and sigmoid sinus thrombosis, and we review the diagnostic options.
Treatment fell into two general categories: (1) for lesions located adjacent to the dura or the tegmental area, such as those occurring in cases of extradural abscess and sigmoid sinus thrombosis, a mastoidectomy was performed by an otologist; (2) when lesions were identified in less easily accessible areas, a craniotomy was performed by a neurosurgeon.
Next, the sigmoid sinus was isolated at the level of the petrosal system, suture-ligated, and resected.
Computed tomography (CT) of the brain and temporal bone demonstrated an extensive opacification of the right mastoid process and indications of erosion of the mastoid surface that created an opening to the posterior cranial fossa at the level of the sigmoid sinus (figure 1).
5) In the middle ear or mastoid portion of the temporal bone, an intracranial meningioma can extend along the path of least resistance through a tegmen tympani to dehiscence, the sulci of the greater and lesser superficial petrosal nerves, the sigmoid sinus plate, the geniculate ganglion area, the internal auditory canal, the lateral semicircular canal, and the perilabyrinthine cell tracts or jugular foramen.