signal molecule


Also found in: Medical.

signal molecule

[′sig·nəl ‚mäl·ə‚kyül]
(biochemistry)
A molecule produced by a signaling cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
aeruginosa to sense alkyl quinolone QS signal molecules so that they could visualize the shape of the QS signal molecule-binding site within the PqsR protein.
NO may have the greatest utility in the area of stem cell research as a signal molecule for undifferentiated cells.
Mr Ignarro, aged 57, and now a pharmacologist at the University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, participated in the quest for the unknown signal molecule posited by Mr Furchgott, and in a brilliant series of analyses, independently and wit h Mr Furchgott, concluded it was nitric oxide.
Now, an international team of researchers led by Professor Christian Weber of Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU) Munich and Privatdozentin Alma Zernecke of WE-rzburg University has demonstrated that dendritic cells release the chemokine CCL17 as a signal molecule, which inhibits a feedback mechanism that normally limits the activity of the immune system.
They say that their findings show that a signal molecule called tenascin-C can trigger the same molecular switch, and also activate the immune system.
We know today that nitric oxide acts as a signal molecule in the nervous system, as a weapon against infections, as a regulator of blood pressure, and as a gatekeeper of blood flow to different organs," the Institute said in its award citation.
The disease is caused by degeneration of a region in the brain that secretes dopamine, a neurotransmitter signal molecule that coordinates voluntary muscle activity.
The disease is caused by degeneration of a specific region in the brain that secretes dopamine, a neurotransmitter signal molecule used to coordinate voluntary muscle activity, and most treatments therefore consist of various attempts to supplement the action of dopamine.
Scientists have developed a tool to examine the molecular anatomy of the opening where the cell discharges signal molecules.
Biochemical assays have shown that the CYP2 enzymes, together, are able to metabolize many chemicals, including more than half of all frequently prescribed drugs, as well as some steroids and arachidonic acid, the major precursor of several classes of signal molecules including the prostaglandins.
Our technology allows us to label the signal molecules of a cell and then visualize cells with faulty signaling, such as cancer cells.
To this end, they release serine proteases - enzymes that cut up other proteins to activate signal molecules.