significance

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significance

[sig′nif·i·kəns]
(mathematics)
The arbitrary rank, priority, or order of relative magnitude assigned to a given position in a number.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first value is presented to 1 significant digit.
Extending the more restrictive listed entity independence requirements to the audits of entities of significant public interest.
The results indicated there was no significant difference between the mean score for each item and the total mean score.
Y selected a monthly accrual period for the DI's entire term for purposes of the OID calculation and, thus, must use the same accrual period for purposes of the significant OID calculation.
Only companies that have reconciled all accounts and understand the potential misstatements that may exist in nonreconciled accounts can be comfortable that their auditor will not identify significant and material financial misstatements during the auditor's review of the SEC filings.
With significant decision factors that cannot be controlled, from energy costs to political instability, a well-managed Cap-X process offers the rare opportunity to use quantitative data to reduce costs and generate savings.
In addition, these freight companies have begun to experience significant capacity problems due to HOS (hours of service) regulation, as well as demographic changes, which have caused a significant decline in the number of individuals seeking employment as truck drivers.
use significant figures correctly in mathematical operations.
One source of significant controversy relating to the new regulations is the definition of the term "covered opinion.
Currently, the most significant butadiene consuming regions of the world are North America, west Europe and northeast Asia with 27%, 22% and 36% of global demand, respectively.
Despite refinements in surgical technique, instrumentation, and anesthetic delivery for tonsillectomy, two areas of concern--bleeding and postoperative pain--remain significant challenges for the surgeon and the patient.
This study--led by Eric Larson, Princeton University: Ryan Katofsky, Navigant Consulting, and Stefano Consonni, Dipartimento di Energetica Politecenico di Milano--clearly showed the significant positive societal impact of transitioning to black liquor gasification combined cycle power generation in the U.