signora


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signora

a married Italian woman: a title of address equivalent to Mrs when placed before a name or madam when used alone
References in periodicals archive ?
After historicism fails to establish truth, the townspeople [tutti] attempt to produce a coherent description of the objective relationship between the family members: the villagers examine the statements of both Signor Ponza and Signora Frola to determine which narrative is most coherent and therefore valid and true.
To return briefly to La Signora di Tutti, a film which functions as a companion piece to Lola Montes: The film, released in 1934, investigates the subject of film stardom, representation and self-reflexivity and the 'family' romance, which can be considered the essence of narrative fiction film.
Signora Valli said: "My husband needs a strong woman like Sarah.
Since neither the Signora nor Madame are especially into politics, both figure they can somehow perform their way out of danger.
La Signora has always been a source of wisdom and advice, and as faithful a confidante and as true a friend as one could hope for.
Signora Frasi was Stevie Donohoe's first winner for Tony Newcombe, who said he had a good bet on her when she was well beaten the time before but let her go unbacked here.
Proudie, his sleazy overreaching chaplain, Obadiah Slope, and the beautiful, wildly over-the-top Signora Neroni are only some of the memorable and entertaining people whose exploits listeners will follow with glee.
It tells the tragically humorous tale of Signora Isotta Barbarino, a middle-class woman on vacation at a seaside resort.
says Lawrence, who will play the pension owner, Signora Fioria.
BNCR, Fonda Gesuitico 1196 (1), 15v, "detto Signor Paolo Emilio non haveva danari, anzi che in quindici anni che [grave{e}] suo marito mai ha havuta cosa alcuna di casa Cesi, ne haveva del suo che potesse vivere, ma sempre [grave{e}] vissuto sopra li beni di essa Illustrissima Signora testatrice.
A Dutch woman, la signora Waal, has found her place in a village on the Italian Riviera, where she settled some fifty years ago with her husband Peter.
Signora Antonelli's baby--she called him her bambino (bam-BEE-no)--was crying.