silver sulfate


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silver sulfate

[′sil·vər ′səl‚fāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
Ag2SO4 Light-sensitive, colorless, lustrous crystals; soluble in alkalies and acids, insoluble in alcohol; melts at 652°C; used as an analytical reagent. Also known as normal silver sulfate.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, somehow, silver was getting deposited on the coin surface, then reacting with sulfur compounds in the environment to form silver sulfide, and then degrading to silver sulfate, tarnishing the coin.
Immersion silver reacts with sulfur-bearing atmospheres to form nonconductive silver sulfate, which then reacts with any exposed copper on the board to form nonconductive copper sulfate, which also causes board failure.
But there are a number of other factors that can cause anosmia including silver sulfate, doxyeyeline (an antibiotic), and a lack of zinc.