silviculture

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silviculture:

see forestryforestry,
the management of forest lands for wood, water, wildlife, forage, and recreation. Because the major economic importance of the forest lies in wood and wood products, forestry has been chiefly concerned with timber management, especially reforestation, maintenance of
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.

silviculture

[′sil·və‚kəl·chər]
(forestry)
The theory and practice of controlling the establishment, composition, and growth of stands of trees for any of the goods and benefits that they may be called upon to produce.

silviculture

the branch of forestry that is concerned with the cultivation of trees
References in periodicals archive ?
He became a certified silviculturist in the southern region in 1984 and has continued that certification since then.
The state has purchased many acres of land that have special ecological meaning, such as lowland wetlands and sand hills," says Leon Irvin, state lands silviculturist.
For Francis Marion National Forest, grants in 1993 and 1994 have made all the difference, says silviculturist John DuPre.
Always skeptical, I had recruited San Carlos District Ranger Cindy Rivera and District Silviculturist Mike Smith to visit Adobe Creek with us.
I asked for an example of an eco-relationship, and Forest Service Silviculturist Al Vazquez pointed to a white fir standing against a large ponderosa pine at the edge of a Clarks meadow.
And as former JNF silviculturist Bob Colona indicated, while pine may not be considered commercially valuable, its loss diminishes an ecosystem's diversity, affecting the flora and fauna species that had been dependent upon it.
It smelled just like the clay in the Willamette Valley across the Cascades," recalls Leslie Sekavec, a Forest Service silviculturist.
Adds Steve Kimball, Forest Service silviculturist, "A diverse forest is a healthy forest.
The payroll of the corporation's management team of foresters and silviculturists accounts for close to $1 million, and it's had a positive impact on area businesses and trucking companies hauling wood to area mills.
Today's forest management within Oregon's many forest ecosystems relies on hydrologists, fish and wildlife biologists, soil scientists, ecologists, silviculturists and others in order to adhere to the strict requirements of the Oregon Forest Practices Act.
These prescriptions were developed by a team of USDA Forest Service regional silviculturists and fuel specialists, and were provided for use in this project.
A forest inventory describing the extent of this conversion has not been completed but the problem has demanded attention by silviculturists in the province (English and Hackett 1994).