similarity coefficient

similarity coefficient

[‚sim·ə′lar·əd·ē ‚kō·i‚fish·ənt]
(systematics)
In numerical taxonomy, a factor S used to calculate the similarity between organisms, according to the formula S = ns /(ns + nd ), where ns represents the number of positive features shared by two strains, and nd represents the number of features positive for one strain and negative for the other.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) shows that the similarity coefficient between any two representatives of the Saucrorthis Fauna is always less than 0.
Jaccard's similarity coefficient was used to calculate similarity between pairs of genotypes.
Unknowns were classified with a curve-based similarity coefficient, and matches for each isolate were accepted at either 80% or 90% similarity because these provided a high level of accuracy for PFGE in a previous methods comparison study (Stoeckel et al.
A similarity coefficient is calculated and the mapping with the highest similarity coefficient is proposed to the user.
PFGE patterns were considered clonally related if they had a similarity coefficient >80% (Dice similarity index and unweighted pair-group with arithmetic mean method).
In particular, the genetic fingerprint relative to 18S rDNA was grouped in 2 clearly separated clusters (INN/CON) with Pearson similarity coefficient of 76.
The fingerprints were compared by the un-weighted pair group method (UPGMA) using arithmetic averages and the Dice similarity coefficient according to criteria suggested by Tenover et al (20).
Among many methods utilized in machine cells formation, the similarity coefficient method is most widely used.
Coexistence of species was calculated using Ochiai's Similarity Coefficient [r.
A pair of machines will have a high similarity coefficient when they perform operations on the same parts:
Furthermore, cluster analysis between evaluated traits showed that root and shoot dry weight had highest genetic similarity coefficient with total dry weight (Fig.
This is the already presented Jaccard similarity coefficient, which is, according to these authors, superior to other coefficients.