simple crater

simple crater

[′sim·pəl ′krād·ər]
(geology)
A meteorite impact crater of relatively small diameter, characterized by a uniformly concave-upward shape and a maximum depth in the center, and lacking a central uplift.
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References in periodicals archive ?
88-km diameter simple crater formed entirely within the Deccan traps (a large volcanic province consisting of many layers of basalt flows), making it a useful analogue for small craters on other terrestrial planets and the Moon.
Arizona's Meteor Crater--also known as Barringer Crater, after the Philadelphia mining engineer who began studying the site in 1902--is the best-preserved terrestrial example of such a so-called simple crater.
The Moon * March 2009 Highlighted feature Size (miles) Description (A) Copernicus (L5 58 Large complex crater (B) Carlini 6 Simple crater (C) Plato (L83) 68 Large lava-filled crater L numbers refer to Charles Wood's Lunar 100 list; see SkyandTelescope.
com/ observing/objects/moon/) is a prime example of a simple crater.
The Lunar 100 L Feature name Significance 5 Copernicus Archetypal large complex crater 61 Mosting A Simple crater close to center of Lunar near side See Sky & Telescope: April 2004, page 113, or point your Web browser to SkyandTelescope.
This simple crater is probably best known for the famous ray that crosses it and seems to continue across Lacus Mortis and on to eastern Mare Frigoris.
By careful telescopic observations you can detect whether a simple crater has a flat or a rounded floor by examining shadows, which, when they fall in the exact center of the crater, are either rounded (parabola-shaped floor) or truncated (flat floor).
There are thousands of similar simple craters on the Moon, all small and with hard-to-see interiors.
The Ariadaeus Rille (named for the small simple crater at its eastern end) is a classic example of the flat-floored, parallel-walled straight rille.
Simple craters have steep walls and small, flat floors, looking like they were turned out by a lathe.
Craters between 25 km and 130 km in diameter usually have a central peak and in proportion to diameter, the excavation zone is much shallower than smaller simple craters.
But these simple craters, as typified by Lalande A near the center of the near-side disk, are too small to reveal much detail telescopically.