simple lens


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simple lens

[′sim·pəl ′lenz]
(optics)
A lens consisting of a single element. Also known as single lens.
References in periodicals archive ?
But it was Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723), said to have been inspired by seeing a copy of Hooke's Micrographia, who is credited with being the first to build a high-resolution, simple lens microscope to view small, living organisms, including bacteria and spermatozoa.
According to J&J, the benefits of the range for practitioners include simple lens selection, whether patients are myopic, hypermetropic or astigmatic, as well as a 93% first-fit success.
It has the simple lens of the human eye, allowing the device to be small, and the zoom capability of the SLR camera without the bulk and weight of a complex lens.
The key is that both the simple lens and photo detectors are on flexible substrates, and a hydraulic system can change the shape of the substrates appropriately, enabling a variable zoom.
In 'Pasaules Optika' centers the Varilux Prelude lenses cost 22 EUR for a simple lens with a hard surface, and 50 EUR for a lens with the new multi-layer AR covering TRIO CLEAN.
The oldest surviving pinhole photographs were probably made by the English archeologist Flinders Petrie (1853-1942) during his excavations in Egypt in the 1880s, although Petrie's camera had a simple lens in front of the pinhole.
With due circumspection he distances himself from critics who analyse the age through a simple lens of either neo-Platonism, Pyrrhonism or rhetoric, preferring the fine-brushed approach that would interpret this 'ensemble de perturbations textuelles comme l'indice d'une incertitude epistemologique, d'une angoisse ontologique ou axiologique' (p.
Los Angeles Times photographer Mark Boster attempted to lift the morale of the reporter/photographers by assuring them that compelling pictures can be shot with a "simple camera and simple lens.
SINCE THE TIME OF GALILEO TELESCOPE makers have been wrestling with chromatic aberration--an optical defect that arises from the inability of a simple lens to bring all colors of light to a single focus.