simple random samples

simple random samples

[¦sim·pəl ¦ran·dəm ′sam·pəlz]
(statistics)
Samples in which every possible sample of size n, that is, every combination of n items from the number in the population, is equally likely to be part of the sample.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because each item in a population has an equal probability of selection on a given draw, simple random samples are considered to be highly representative.
A simple random sample may be selected either with replacement or without replacement.
If a simple random sample were used, you would have no assurance (due to sampling error) that the floor plan mix of the sample would be identical to the floor plan mix of the population.
All groups are simple random samples from their respective populations.
Each group is a simple random sample from its population.
According to Cochran (1977), method 2 works well enough if the sample allocation is proportional because a simple random sample distributes itself approximately proportionally among strata.