sine wave


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Sine wave

A wave having a form which, if plotted, would be the same as that of a trigonometric sine or cosine function. The sine wave may be thought of as the projection on a plane of the path of a point moving around a circle at uniform speed. It is characteristic of one-dimensional vibrations and one-dimensional waves having no dissipation. See Harmonic motion

The sine wave is the basic function employed in harmonic analysis. It can be shown that any complex motion in a one-dimensional system can be described as the superposition of sine waves having certain amplitude and phase relationships. The technique for determining these relationships is known as Fourier analysis. See Wave equation, Wave motion

sine wave

[′sīn ‚wāv]
(physics)
A wave whose amplitude varies as the sine of a linear function of time. Also known as sinusoidal wave.

sine wave

A wave form containing only one frequency; the amplitude of the periodic oscillation is a sinusoidal function of time. Also see pure tone.

sine wave

(mathematics)
A waveform of a single constant frequency and amplitude that continues for all time.

Compare wavelet.

sine wave

A continuous, uniform wave with a constant frequency and amplitude. See wavelength.


A Sine Wave
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Modified sine wave UPS output is shown in figure 4, which shows that the distortion in the wave form.
The portable sine wave inverter has been re-purposed to charge cordless tool batteries from my truck alternator at jobsites.
Table 2a: Correlation values and differences for the clipped-sample restoration of the 1 kHz sine wave signal, using the two programs
Expect to pay about $30 to $50 for a standard 200-watt modified wave inverter and about $150 to $250 for a pure sine wave inverter.
What is the highest sine wave frequency component we must include in the resulting time domain waveform?
The size of the impedance of this system can be expressed by taking the ratio of the size of the voltage sine wave (in volts) to that of the current sine wave (in amperes).
5 GHz sine wave and a 5 Gbit/s digital code input signals.
Currently the standard test procedure is to measure the stiffness for sine wave input at a regular series of frequencies, for example every 10 hz from 0 hz to 200 hz.
Sine wave commutation provides smooth torque at low speeds, useful for robotic, direct drive, and linear motor applications.
Real estate cycles, especially for office markets, don't follow a sine wave cycle pattern from one time period to another.
It is easier, in working with electric generators, however, to get a kind of current that goes first in one direction, then in the other, alternating very rapidly, with the current intensity rising and falling like a sine wave.