singularity


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singularity

(sing-gyŭ-la -ră-tee) A mathematical point at which space and time are infinitely distorted. Calculations predict that every black hole must contain a singularity: matter falling into a black hole will ultimately be compressed to infinite densities at a single point, and in such conditions our laws of physics, including quantum mechanics, must break down. One black-hole theorem – the principle of cosmic censorship – states that singularities are always concealed by an event horizon so that they cannot communicate their existence to an observer in our Universe. However, if a naked singularity – a singularity without an event horizon – is found, then some of our physical concepts will need reexamination.

singularity

[‚siŋ·gyə′lar·əd·ē]
(mathematics)
A point where a function of real or complex variables is not differentiable or analytic. Also known as singular point of a function.
(meteorology)
A characteristic meteorological condition which tends to occur on or near a specific calendar date more frequently than chance would indicate; an example is the January thaw.
(relativity)
A region of space-time where one or more components of the Riemann curvature tensor becomes infinite.

singularity

(1) See technology singularity.

(2) (Singularity) An experimental operating system from Microsoft for the x86 platform written almost entirely in C#, a .NET managed code language. Released in 2007, Singularity is a non-Windows research project.

Like Windows, there is only one address space, but for security and crash protection, it runs each OS or application process in an environment called a "software-isolated process" (SIP). Unlike other OS architectures, SIPs and the interprocess communications between them are analyzed for compliance at compile time. In addition, when a program is installed, it must include a manifest of its actions that comply with certain rules. For more information, visit http://research.microsoft.com/os/singularity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The idea of a technological singularity can be traced back to a number of different thinkers.
But a new theory proposed earlier this month by two Cambridge researchers is the first time a naked singularity has been predicted in four dimensions.
The Singularity is an enormous opportunity, and the best way to make the most of it is by getting kids into science.
Vemor Vinge, computer scientist and science fiction author, was the first to deliver the idea of the Singularity into our thoughts in 1993.
Output: An integer E, the Euler characteristic of plane curve singularity.
I have several philosophical, logical, ethical, historical, and futurological problems with the concept of the Singularity, but for now I simply want to ask 10 questions about machine intelligence to see how it compares with that of humans.
Designation S1-S6 or N1-N5 then implies that under the assumption there is the stable (S) or unstable (N) singularity and so the author of the article considered this memory structure as six-valued.
This is the singularity that Karl Schwarzschild discovered when he solved Einstein's field equations for a symmetrical, non-rotating body.
But nearly every computer scientist will have a different prediction for when and how the singularity will happen.
MY KID IS GOING to have an extraordinarily interesting life," declares Singularity University CEO Rob Nail.
Software highlights include: point-and-click singularity insertion and editing; problem simulation; and circulation and force computation.
From the latest research on the singularity and how it relates to UFOs to theories about the UFOs being time travelers from our future, and the latest observations about their advanced technology, this is a recommendation for any new age collection where UFOs are of interest.