singularity


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singularity

(sing-gyŭ-la -ră-tee) A mathematical point at which space and time are infinitely distorted. Calculations predict that every black hole must contain a singularity: matter falling into a black hole will ultimately be compressed to infinite densities at a single point, and in such conditions our laws of physics, including quantum mechanics, must break down. One black-hole theorem – the principle of cosmic censorship – states that singularities are always concealed by an event horizon so that they cannot communicate their existence to an observer in our Universe. However, if a naked singularity – a singularity without an event horizon – is found, then some of our physical concepts will need reexamination.

singularity

[‚siŋ·gyə′lar·əd·ē]
(mathematics)
A point where a function of real or complex variables is not differentiable or analytic. Also known as singular point of a function.
(meteorology)
A characteristic meteorological condition which tends to occur on or near a specific calendar date more frequently than chance would indicate; an example is the January thaw.
(relativity)
A region of space-time where one or more components of the Riemann curvature tensor becomes infinite.

singularity

(1) See technology singularity.

(2) (Singularity) An experimental operating system from Microsoft for the x86 platform written almost entirely in C#, a .NET managed code language. Released in 2007, Singularity is a non-Windows research project.

Like Windows, there is only one address space, but for security and crash protection, it runs each OS or application process in an environment called a "software-isolated process" (SIP). Unlike other OS architectures, SIPs and the interprocess communications between them are analyzed for compliance at compile time. In addition, when a program is installed, it must include a manifest of its actions that comply with certain rules. For more information, visit http://research.microsoft.com/os/singularity.
References in classic literature ?
The singularity of the event, the force and importance of the personal feelings aroused in the course of this confession, drove Stevie's fate clean out of Mr Verloc's mind.
It is not necessary, I'm sure it is not necessary, that he should leave us," said Ellen, with a haste that implied some little consciousness of the singularity if not of the impropriety of the request.
Haredale, my dear friend, pardon me if I think you are not sufficiently impressed with its singularity.
Add to the singularity, Sir John,' said Mr Haredale, 'that some of you Protestants of promise are at this moment leagued in yonder building, to prevent our having the surpassing and unheard-of privilege of teaching our children to read and write--here--in this land, where thousands of us enter your service every year, and to preserve the freedom of which, we die in bloody battles abroad, in heaps: and that others of you, to the number of some thousands as I learn, are led on to look on all men of my creed as wolves and beasts of prey, by this man Gashford.
It was a further singularity of this remarkable case, that the more she thought about it, the more impossible it appeared; 'the differences,' she observed, 'being such.
I haven't got to keep it warm,' Mr Wegg made answer, in a sort of desperation occasioned by the singularity of the question.
It was late in the afternoon when the four friends and their four-footed companion turned into the lane leading to Manor Farm; and even when they were so near their place of destination, the pleasure they would otherwise have experienced was materially damped as they reflected on the singularity of their appearance, and the absurdity of their situation.
Nail is Chief Executive Officer and Associate Founder of Singularity University, the educational institution and business accelerator committed to creating positive global impact through exponential technologies.
Transcendence: The Disinformation Encyclopedia of Transhumanism and the Singularity considers the ideas behind an international movement that advocates using science and technology to overcome the 'natural' limitations experienced by humanity, from the Singularity (creating advanced machine intelligence systems) to replacing individual minds with virtual or collective processes.
Conventional understanding holds that the big bang began with a singularity -- an unfathomably hot and dense phenomenon of spacetime where the standard laws of physics break down.
The preliminary chapters discuss singularity theory for KAM tori, review methodology and present a flow chart of the monograph, and present notation, geometric and analytic background, symplectic deformations, and cohomology equations.