singularity theorems

singularity theorems

[‚siŋ·gyə′lar·əd·ē ‚thir·əmz]
(relativity)
Theorems proving that singularities must develop in certain space-times, such as the universe, given only broad conditions, such as causality, and the existence of a trapped surface.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The highlight was the cosmological singularity theorems, developing from Roger Penrose's ideas about black holes, showing that (under reasonable assumptions) classical general relativity necessarily implies there was a start to the universe: a space-time singularity that is the boundary to where normal physics applies.
Moreover, the unconditional universal coupling is a crucial assumption (1) for the singularity theorems of Hawking and Penrose (Hawking and Ellis 1973).
A hidden agenda of the implicit assumption of universal equivalence of energy and mass is to justify the universal coupling that is a vital assumption of the singularity theorems (Wald 1984).