SIR


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Sir

1. a title of honour placed before the name of a knight or baronet
2. Archaic a title placed before the name of a figure from ancient history

SIR

(language)
An early system on the IBM 650.

[Listed in CACM 2(5):16, May 1959].

SIR

(standard)
Serial Infrared. An infrared standard from IrDA, part of IrDA Data. SIR supports asynchronous communications at 9600 bps - 115.2 Kbps, at a distance of up to 1 metre.

SIR

(Serial InfraRed) The physical protocol of the IrDA wireless transmission standard. See IrDA.
References in classic literature ?
Then was Arthur wroth and said to himself, 'I will ride to the churchyard, and take the sword with me that sticketh in the stone, for my brother Sir Kay shall not be without a sword this day.
inquired Sir Patrick, advancing to meet them, and looking as if he felt the deepest interest in a speedy settlement of the question.
HOW SIR LAUNCELOT SLEW TWO GIANTS, AND MADE A CASTLE FREE
Oh, wery well, Sir,' replied Sam, 'we shan't be bankrupts, and we shan't make our fort'ns.
This man has just arrived from Paris, sir," he continued, "and is the bearer of a letter which he is instructed to deliver into your hands only.
Whether I shall introduce myself with the same formality,' said Mr Pluck--'whether I shall say myself that my name is Pluck, or whether I shall ask my friend Pyke (who being now regularly introduced, is competent to the office) to state for me, Mrs Nickleby, that my name is Pluck; whether I shall claim your acquaintance on the plain ground of the strong interest I take in your welfare, or whether I shall make myself known to you as the friend of Sir Mulberry Hawk-- these, Mrs Nickleby, are considerations which I leave to you to determine.
Would you permit me to shut the door, sir, and will you further, sir, give me your honour bright, that what passes between us is in the strictest confidence?
For my part," said Sir Simon Burley, "I am of opinion that we have already done that which we have come for.
Nay," quoth Sir Richard, "the stables of this place are not for me, so make way, I prythee.
I don't like to speak ill of any one, sir, but she was a heartless woman, with a terrible will of her own--fond of foolish admiration and fine clothes, and not caring to show so much as decent outward respect to Catherick, kindly as he always treated her.
Then let him, sir,' retorted Kit; 'what do I care, sir, what he thinks?
Everybody on Sir Leicester Dedlock's side of the question and of his way of thinking would appear to be his cousin more or less.