sitar

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sitar

(sĭtär`), fretted string instrument with a gourdlike body and a long neck, similar to the lute. It has from 3 to 7 gut strings, tuned in fourths or fifths (or both), and a lower course of 12 wire strings that vibrate sympathetically with the first set. It is played alone or in a small ensemble. Indigenous to the India subcontinent, the sitar was popularized in the West in the 1960s by the Indian virtuoso Ravi ShankarShankar, Ravi
(Robindra Shankar Chowdhury), 1920–2012, Indian sitarist and composer, b. Varanasi. He was the first Indian instrumentalist to attain an international reputation and is credited with introducing traditional Indian music to the West.
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 and is sometimes used in rock music.

Sitar

 

a stringed musical instrument. The sitar has a wooden convex body, a long neck with 16 to 18 movable frets, and three melody strings and up to ten sympathetic strings. The strings are tuned in fourths and fifths. The sitar is native to India, where it is a plucked instrument, and Uzbekistan and Tadzhik-istan, where it is often bowed as well as plucked. [23–1426–]

sitar

a stringed musical instrument, esp of India, having a long neck, a rounded body, and movable frets. The main strings, three to seven in number, overlie other sympathetic strings, the tuning depending on the raga being performed
References in periodicals archive ?
Shankar had introduced sitar to the Western world through his collaborations with The Beatles.
Sharma said with age, the maestro's sitar were getting smaller and lighter in size, as he used to find it difficult to handle them.
Sharma said that three generations of his family were associated with Pandit Ravi Shankar and the last sitar, which he crafted, had an internal microphone in the instrument.
Sharma had also crafted a small sitar with a stand, which the maestro could play comfortably while sitting on sofa.
Sharma's son, who was also learning sitar from Ravi Shankar, Rishabh Sharma said it was a sad moment for him.
these centers who developed the performance practices that were to contribute to the present repertory and musical style of the sitar and sarod.
Weaving together her narrative by drawing upon writings of British Company officers, court chroniclers, late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century manuals for the sitar, and the anecdotes of oral tradition, she portrays a flourishing musical culture that was experiencing dynamic growth and change, the ebb and flow of which was often tied to the fortunes and misfortunes of the royal courts.
The final section of the book makes use of several previously unresearched Urdu and Hindi manuals for the sitar and sarod that appeared in the late nineteenth century.
Overall, this book is a fact-filled treasure of information about the early history of the sitar and sarod.
Harrison later became the first Western pop star to play a sitar on the song Norwegian Wood, and visited Shankar in Kashmir the following year to take sitar lessons.