sceptic

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sceptic

(archaic and US), skeptic
1. a person who habitually doubts the authenticity of accepted beliefs
2. a person who doubts the truth of religion, esp Christianity
References in periodicals archive ?
The thinker launches a volley of questions, and it is not personal; with a skeptic, it is.
Google backs not only the hyper-conservative Cato Institute, but also the Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI), which are among the most influential players of the organized climate skeptic scene.
Then I describe the issue of the climate change skeptic counterpublic in Germany.
All of this may coalesce into the attitude that being a religious skeptic today is not as unique as it once was.
This sets something of a pattern for a large number of other skeptic vs.
Even the nature lovers among us do this in a world replete with an abundance of information and technological advances, skeptics or not.
With sympathy to the skeptic, 'The Problem of the Criterion' by Richard Fumerton and 'Cartesian Skepticism' by Jose Luis Bermudez continues the exploration of the problem that arises when a distinction is made between how things are represented and how they actually are.
Beyond TAM, the dedicated skeptic can make pilgrimages to myriad events like the Northeast Conference on Science and Skepticism, QED ("Question.
Summary: A prominent physicist and skeptic of global warming spent two years trying to find out if mainstream climate scientists were wrong.
com's home page features a list of the 10 most common Skeptic Arguments (eg 'Climate's changed before'), presented in the form of a thermometer.
Any of these rankings are epistemologically irrelevant for the type of skeptic who poses an argument such as the Cartesian dreaming argument: such a skeptic challenges us to give good reasons for holding any and all the sensory-based beliefs we have about the empirical world --and thus leaves us in the meager epistemological position of not being able to appeal to any of those beliefs.
He proposes instead a volitional theism, and develops a type of argument from religious experience based on the transformative power that God has had in the believer's life that is likewise available to the skeptic.