Sketch

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sketch,

a rapidly executed kind of pictorial note-taking. The sketch is not usually intended as an autonomous work of art, although many have been considered masterpieces in their own right. Used extensively in the planning of large, complex projects, the sketch allows the artist to visualize quickly the bend of a knee or the sweep of an arm without having to experiment directly on the work itself. See cartooncartoon
[Ital., cartone=paper], either of two types of drawings: in the fine arts, a preliminary sketch for a more complete work; in journalism, a humorous or satirical drawing.
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sketch

A rough drawing that represents the main features of a plan or building; used as a preliminary study. See also: Design drawing

Sketch

 

a quickly executed drawing, usually in pencil, which captures the major and most characteristic features of a landscape or which provides the general plan of an architectural structure, painting, sculpture, or graphic work.


Sketch

 

in the plastic arts, a small drawing, painting, or sculpture cursorily and rapidly executed by the artist. The main purpose of a sketch is to quickly record the observations and ideas that arise as the artist works. A sketch can be made without a model from memory or the imagination. A sketch working out a composition conceived by the artist is similar to a study.


Sketch

 

in the 19th and early 20th centuries, a short play with two and occasionally three characters. The sketch was most widely performed on the variety stage. Sketches were written by J. Barrie, B. Shaw, and J. B. Priestley (Great Britain), W. Saroyan and J. Thurber (USA), G. Courteline (France), and A. T. Averchenko and the young A. P. Chekhov (Russia). Writers of sketches during the Soviet period included V. E. Ardov, A. S. Bukhov, G. I. Gorin, A. M. Arkhanov, M. M. Zhvanetskii, la. A. Kostiukovskii, V. Z. Mass, and V. S. Poliakov.

REFERENCE

Ardov, V. E. Razgovornye zhanry estrady i tsirka. Moscow, 1968.

Sketch

 

a preliminary drawing that sets forth the main idea of an entire work of art or an individual part, including the composition, spatial planes, and color scheme of the future work. Sketches may be drawn for works of graphic art, paintings, or sculptures. They are usually distinguished by a free, fluent style but may be quite detailed.

Sketches by major artists possess artistic value and may be considered complete works in themselves.

sketch

1. a rapid drawing or painting, often a study for subsequent elaboration
2. a brief usually descriptive and informal essay or other literary composition
3. a short play, often comic, forming part of a revue
4. a short evocative piece of instrumental music, esp for piano
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of these moves were described in sketchily written records as "temporary.
In two related paintings by Henri Matisse, his spare, terse impromptu, Still Life of Fruit and Flowers, is transposed, although still sketchily, to his portrait of his wife, Madame Matisse in a Kimono.
Taking its title from his father's advice to "treat all people--even the most unsightly beetles--as if they were angels sent from heaven," this remembrance often takes the contours of a fable with its idealized heroes who meet tragic deaths (his father Heilab and brother Tewolde), angelic and sketchily rendered female characters (relief workers, volunteers, as well as his mother and sisters).
Leggon has sketchily noted that there are too many scientists chasing too few academic positions and research grants.
However, this thesis is only sketchily developed, and sometimes defies common sense.
Still according to Van Jaarsveld, world history was treated extremely sketchily in Afrikaner textbooks until 1960, whilst the history of mankind was taught exclusively according to the Bible and starred with Genesis, no account had been taken of advances in prehistoric anthropology.
In the extremely polite exchange sketchily covering such topics as women's role in the Catholic church and abortion rights, Martini gives up no ground whatsoever while Eco tends to bend too far.
Most of the secondary characters were so sketchily drawn that it was up to the dancers to make something of them.
There is certainly fascinating material, and the evidence marshalled is compelling, but the exposition reads sketchily.
Commentators have varied in their identification of the sex of these two figures, because, as Clark Hulse pointed out, they are "so sketchily drawn that it is difficult to tell who they are and what they are doing.
This lack of respect is to the point where their opponents are dealt with only sketchily.
It may be the author or his publishers who are primarily at fault here, but some technical parts of the exposition are too sketchily presented.