skid


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skid

1. Chiefly US and Canadian one of the logs forming a skidway
2. a support on which heavy objects may be stored and moved short distances by sliding
3. a shoe or drag used to apply pressure to the metal rim of a wheel to act as a brake

Skid

 

the locking of the wheels of a vehicle—for example, a motor vehicle, a streetcar, or railroad rolling stock—while the vehicle is in motion. As a result of such locking, the wheels slide over the bearing surface rather than turn.

A skid occurs when the braking force exceeds the force of adhesion between the wheels and the surface of a road or track, for example, in the presence of glaze ice or after rain. Skidding increases the braking distance and may cause traffic accidents. As a rule, the skidding of the rear wheels of a motor vehicle results in sideslip of the rear axle.

To avoid skids, modern motor vehicles may be equipped with automatic devices that prevent the wheels from locking.

skid

[skid]
(aerospace engineering)
The metal bar or runner used as part of the landing gear of helicopters and planes.
(engineering)
A device attached to a chain and placed under a wheel to prevent its turning when descending a steep hill.
A timber, bar, rail, or log placed under a heavy object when it is being moved over bare ground.
A wood or metal platform support on wheels, legs, or runners used for handling and moving material. Also known as skid platform.
(mechanical engineering)
A brake for a power machine.
(mining engineering)
An arrangement upon which certain coal-cutting machines travel along the working faces.

skid

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skid
skidclick for a larger image
i. An uncoordinated turn in which the airplane moves inside the turn because of an insufficient aileron or excessive rudder.
ii. In helicopters, a fixed tubular landing gear, often provided with small auxiliary wheels to provide ground mobility.
iii. A rigid ski-shaped member projecting ahead of the landing gear to prevent them from nosing over.
iv. A support for the tail-wheel on the ground in airplanes of early years.
v. A member mounted at the bottom of the aft end of the fuselage of an aircraft with a tricycle undercarriage. The skid absorbs the shock and prevents damage to the aircraft structure if the skid touches the ground either on the takeoff or the landing.
References in periodicals archive ?
For many, the benefit of skid steers lies in their maneuverability and versatility.
First he removed the hoses from both lift ports on the skid steer, leaving the other ends attached to the cylinders.
Henrik, my Swedish colleague, reported that in his country, for example, learning to control a skid on the skid pan is part and parcel of the driving test.
Then skid trails and cable lines were designed on maps with regard to these observations and also skid borders.
cartridge filter skid, two trains of cartridge filters), pump skid #1 (domestic water booster pump
s Skid Row is a 50-square-block area where an estimated 3,700 homeless men and women lived in 2005.
The company prefers wheel loaders to skid steers because they enable The Sutta Co.
The equipment is used worldwide for skid training and can create all types of skid including aquaplaning.
There's no age profile for the clients who come here to find out how to handle a skid.
Skid resistances of rubber compounds were also measured on the smooth surface of PTFE by BPST at each temperature from 0 [degree] C to -20 [degrees] C to evaluate the skid resistance on dry condition.
July 31, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Camfil Air Pollution Control (APC) now offers its Farr Gold Series dust collection systems in a skid package that speeds and simplifies installation.