skirl

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skirl

the sound of bagpipes
References in periodicals archive ?
Sakari Oramo gave the piece the credit it deserves, summoning tight trumpetplaying in the exhilarating Intermezzo, drawing yet another perennially eloquent cor anglais solo from Peter Walden in the Ballade, and unleashing stirring brass and percussion and skirling woodwind in the Alla Marcia.
WITH his kilt swinging and pipes skirling, the newest member of the Wombles touched down in his Scots homeland yesterday - and picked up his favourite paper.
The fabulous skirling dance of death enshrined in the second movement's scherzo is a spectacular example of the music's extrovert qualities, but is followed by an introspective passacaglia (melodies evolving over an endlessly repeated bass line, and a technique often employed by Shostakovich's friend Benjamin Britten) which brings an inexorable emotional build-up.
For pounds 170, hotel guests will sample the delights of caber tossing, kilt folding, salmon fishing and bagpipe skirling during a two- night break.
Bartok's Dance Suite even takes us to Algeria as well as Romania and his native Hungary, but one eventually loses patience with this sequence of skirling gipsy sounds and peasant drones.
A windbag English Tory is skirling for a ban on the BAGPIPES.
Award winners include The Inn at Whitewell, Cross House Lodge in Harome, North Yorks; The Bell at Skenfrith, Monmouth; Rock Cottage at Schull in Co Cork; Skirling House at Skirling in The Borders; Duke's Hotel, London; The Well House, St Keyne, Cornwall; Grove House at Hamsterley Forest, Co Durham; The Castleman in Chettle, Dorset; Glencot House outside Wells, Somerset.
Mahler's collages of material, with their demandingly pictorial instrumental effects, were triumphantly achieved by the players and assembled with clarity by Saraste, not least in skirling parades of an almost Ivesian ebullience.
We also enjoyed the original jazz-band version of the Scherzo a la Russe, skirling like Petrushka's fairground and bursting with energetic panache, if a little cloudy in texture.
Chamber-like textures in Nielsen's Flute Concerto drew impressive contributions from a range of orchestral principals, not least the skirling clarinet of Timothy Baker and the noble trombone of Alex Stewart, as they pitted their wits successively against the elegant, ever-present playing of soloist Clare Findlater.