Skylight

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skylight

[′skī‚līt]
(astrophysics)
(engineering)
An opening in a roof or ship deck that is covered with glass or plastic and designed to admit daylight.

Skylight

An opening in a roof which is glazed with a transparent or translucent material used to admit natural or diffused light to the space below.

Skylight

 

(1) A usually round or polygonal structure with large window openings, situated atop a cupola or other type of roof and designed to provide illumination of the structure.

(2) A glassed-in section of a roof, designed to provide overhead illumination.

(3) A roof section in an industrial building, usually in the form of a superstructure with openings, designed to provide natural illumination and/or ventilation of the premises. Most skylights are rectangular in shape, but trapezoidal, gabled, triangular, and other designs are also used. Those providing illumination only or both illumination and ventilation feature casements with single or double windowpanes. If the skylight is not intended to provide ventilation, the casements are usually not designed to be opened; otherwise, remote-control mechanisms are used to open and close the casements. In addition to conventional skylight designs, commercial buildings are often equipped with overhead, chimney-like structures, the upper openings of which are approximately flush with the roof. This type of skylight has a support section mounted on a roofing slab or beam and a transparent or translucent cover in the form of a panel, dome, or arch. The cover may be made of plate or shaped glass, poly methyl methacrylate (organic glass), insulation glass units, or polyester fiber glass. Ventilation skylights are used mainly in buildings where considerable amounts of heat, gas, and dust are generated. They are usually equipped with wind-protection panels and sheet-steel casements that open and close.

REFERENCES

Drozdov, V. A. Fonari i okna promyshlennykh zdanii. Moscow, 1972.
Konstruktsii promyshlennykh zdanii. Edited by A. N. Popov. Moscow, 1972.

IU. P. ALEKSANDROV

skylight

skylight
In a roof, an opening which is glazed with a transparent or translucent material; used to admit diffused light to the space below. Compare with dome light. Also see hip skylight, lantern skylight, monitor skylight, pitched skylight, sawtooth skylight.
References in classic literature ?
The skylight above was open, and the prisoner gone.
Sick and beaten, Paul took the masterpiece back to his skylight room.
At a touch, all the electric lights were turned on, and revealed a crowd of people all standing, all looking with rather strained faces up at the skylight, but when they saw each other in the artificial light they turned at once and began to move away.
This was too much, and the black, afraid more of Van Horn than of Jerry, turned and fled for'ard, leaping to safety on top of the eight Lee-Enfield rifles that lay on top of the cabin skylight and that were guarded by one member of the boat's crew.
Duncan puffed at his cigar and waited till his wife's voice, in talk with the cabin-boy, came up through the open skylight.
Our mess-room," he said, entering a small cabin painted white, bare, lighted from part of the foremost skylight, and furnished only with a table and two settees with movable backs.
Through the glass of the little skylight you saw a square of blue infinity.
A small window with a shutter on each side, and a skylight in the roof, gave it light by, day; and after dark there was a lamp always burning.
Raffles, seated on a skylight, and leaning over one of the officers' long chairs, in which reclined a girl in a white drill coat and skirt--a slip of a girl with a pale skin, dark hair, and rather remarkable eyes.
I heard nothing but the quickening crackle of the flames, and the sharp snap of the glass in the skylight above.
Hermann sat placidly on the skylight, with a woollen shawl on her shoul ders.
Then, just as we were thinking of repose, the watchmen of the schooner would hail a splash of paddles away in the starlit gloom of the bay; a voice would respond in cautious tones, and our serang, putting his head down the open skylight, would inform us without surprise, "That Rajah, he coming.