slack


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slack

1
1. 
a. a patch of water without current
b. a slackening of a current
2. Prosody (in sprung rhythm) the unstressed syllable or syllables

slack

2
small pieces of coal with a high ash content

slack

[slak]
(engineering)
Looseness or play in a mechanism, as the play in the trigger of a small-arms weapon.
(geology)
A hollow or depression between lines of shore dunes or in a sandbank or mudbank on a shore.

slack

1. Coal of relatively fine size, usually not exceeding 2½ in. (6.35 cm) in diameter; often screenings.
2. Fitting loosely.

slack

(operating system)
Internal fragmentation. Space allocated to a disk file but not actually used to store useful information.

slack

(jargon)
In the theology of the Church of the SubGenius, a mystical substance or quality that is the prerequisite of all human happiness.

Since Unix files are stored compactly, except for the unavoidable wastage in the last block or fragment, it might be said that "Unix has no slack".

See ha ha only serious.

Slack

A messaging app for team collaboration from Slack Technologies (www.slack.com). Introduced in 2013 and originally developed as a tool for its own video game development, Slack lets people organize chat "channels" for projects, departments, groups of users, etc., all of which reside in a sidebar. Messages can also be made private, and files can be shared by dropping them into a channel.

Documents can be searched, and social media, cloud storage and other services can be plugged in to keep all communications in one place. Available as a freemium product, the paid versions offer many more features, including tech support, usage statistics and unlimited searching and service integration. See collaborative software.
References in classic literature ?
That would often be ten or eleven o'clock, which was bad enough, in all conscience; but now, in the slack season, they would perhaps not have a thing for their men to do till late in the afternoon.
Cedric the Saxon, if offended, and he is noway slack in taking offence, is a man who, without respect to your knighthood, my high office, or the sanctity of either, would clear his house of us, and send us to lodge with the larks, though the hour were midnight.
So, with the cunning of a madman, I backed into the far corner of my cell when next I heard him approaching and gathering a little slack of the great chain which held me in my hand I waited his coming, crouching like some beast of prey.
He tugged and pulled at his bonds until he was exhausted; but not entirely without hope, for he was sure that he was working enough slack out of the knot to eventually permit of his withdrawing one of his hands.
It is said, too, that he can only pass running water at the slack or the flood of the tide.
And now for an instant the men stood, their rifles slack in their hands, and watched the regiment dwindle.
I call to mind a winter landscape in Amsterdam - a flat foreground of waste land, with here and there stacks of timber, like the huts of a camp of some very miserable tribe; the long stretch of the Handelskade; cold, stone-faced quays, with the snow-sprinkled ground and the hard, frozen water of the canal, in which were set ships one behind another with their frosty mooring-ropes hanging slack and their decks idle and deserted, because, as the master stevedore (a gentle, pale person, with a few golden hairs on his chin and a reddened nose) informed me, their cargoes were frozen-in up-country on barges and schuyts.
That intolerable cub shuffled about so sleepily and lolled against the rails in such a slack, improper fashion that I came down on him sharply.
I wouldn't give a penny for a man as 'ud drive a nail in slack because he didn't get extra pay for it.
King Agamemnon," said he, "let us not stay talking here, nor be slack in the work that heaven has put into our hands.
It was attached to a stout cross-timber above his head and the slack fell to the level of his knees.
He was one of those boys who are too slack to play games, and he exercised great ingenuity in making excuses to avoid such as were compulsory.